Oil Based Lube – Oil based lube feels a little smoother and silkier than water-based lube. It also lasts for ages, so it’s perfect for anal sex, but there are some significant drawbacks. It’s much harder to wash out of linens. More importantly, oil-based lube degrades latex condoms making them tear and rip. Bottom line, if you don’t want the condom to tear during the act, then don’t use an oil-based lube.

^ Nussbaum, Martha C. (1994). "Platonic Love and Colorado Law: The Relevance of Ancient Greek Norms to Modern Sexual Controversies". Virginia Law Review. 80 (7): 1562–3. JSTOR 1073514. (Registration required (help)). the kinaidos is clearly a person who chronically plays the passive role [...] More recently, I have been convince by arguments of the late John J. Winkler that kinaidos usually connotes willingness to accept money for sex, as well as habitual passivity [...] In any case, there is no doubt that we are not dealing with an isolated act, but rather a type of person who habitually chooses activity that Callicles finds shameful. That, and no view about same-sex relations per se, is the basis of his criticism. In fact, Callicles is depicted as having a young boyfriend of his own. *The boyfriend is named Demos, also the name for the Athenian "people," to whom Callicles is also devoted. It is likely that the pun on the name is sexual: as Callicles seduces Demos, so also the demos. (It would be assumed that he would practice intercrural intercourse with this boyfriend, thus avoiding putting him in anything like the kinaidos shamed position
The Renaissance poet Pietro Aretino advocated anal sex in his Sonetti Lussuriosi (Lust Sonnets).[125] While men who engaged in homosexual relationships were generally suspected of engaging in anal sex, many such individuals did not. Among these, in recent times, have been André Gide, who found it repulsive;[126] and Noël Coward, who had a horror of disease, and asserted when young that "I'd never do anything – well the disgusting thing they do – because I know I could get something wrong with me".[127]
Most of the risk with oral sex is associated with the possibility of contracting or spreading STDs. Almost all STDs can be spread through oral sex, like HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Herpes (mostly HSV-1), gonorrhea, and chlamydia can all infect the mouth, lips, or throat. If you have herpes type 1 (cold sores) and perform oral sex, you may transmit it to your partner which could cause genital herpes to develop.
Although people tend to think that having an orgasm is the goal of sex, you can get lots of pleasure from doing sexual things even if you don’t have an orgasm. In fact, putting a lot of pressure on having an orgasm can make you or your partner anxious, which can make sex stressful and less enjoyable. Relax, and remember that pleasure, not orgasms, is the goal.
9. “My old boyfriend actually broke up with me because I asked him to try anal. It’s okay because he sucked in bed anyways and he wasn’t open to ANYTHING. I’ve heard a mix about it, but I’ve always been open to trying new things in bed to keep my sex life interesting. Apparently he thought it was weird, which is fine because my current boyfriend and I love it.” – Bella, 31
Although anal sex alone does not lead to pregnancy, pregnancy can still occur with anal sex or other forms of sexual activity if the penis is near the vagina (such as during intercrural sex or other genital-genital rubbing) and its sperm is deposited near the vagina's entrance and travels along the vagina's lubricating fluids; the risk of pregnancy can also occur without the penis being near the vagina because sperm may be transported to the vaginal opening by the vagina coming in contact with fingers or other non-genital body parts that have come in contact with semen.[82][83]
^ Ken Plummer (2002). Modern Homosexualities: Fragments of Lesbian and Gay Experiences. Routledge. pp. 187–191. ISBN 1134922426. Retrieved August 24, 2013. The social construction of 'sex' as vaginal intercourse affects how other forms of sexual activity are evaluated as sexually satisfying or arousing; in some cases whether an activity is seen as a sexual act at all. For example, unless a woman has been penetrated by a man's penis she is still technically a virgin even if she has had lots of sexual experience.
You don’t need to. As we just established, the chances of you pooping on your partner mid-act are slim to none. But there’s usually no harm in doing an enema as long as you're not doing it often enough to irritate your rectum, Dr. Frankhouse says. He recommends only doing them once every few months and following the instructions every time. If your butt starts feeling irritated when you do enemas, that's a sign you should quit.
"People assume that those who try anal sex have to be gay, or that only men like to have anal, or that having anal is weird, shameful, and wrong because the butt is supposed to only be an 'exit,'" Van Kirk tells BuzzFeed Health. "But that's not true at all. Anyone can experiment with and enjoy anal. In fact, anal sex is the primary form of sex in some countries where birth control is not available to them."
Start With A Lubed Finger – If you read the Anal Sex Preparation Guide here, you’ll know that it’s best to try penetrating yourself ALONE first with a finger covered in lube so that you get to see how your sphincter reacts to it. If you’ve already done this a few times and have a good idea of how long it takes to relax around your finger, then you can get your man to do the honors this time. If you haven’t done it by yourself yet, then I recommend that you try it alone first while following these instructions.
Partaking in any form of sex – be it oral, anal, or vaginal, can put one at risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Anal sex, however, carries the highest risk of transmission. This is because the tissue in the anus is quite fragile and thus incurs small, microscopic tears during the act of anal sex. These tears expose trace amounts of blood, making it much more likely for HIV and/or Hepatitis B or C to be transmitted. The risk of contracting these STIs is greater for the recipient (aka the “bottom”), but the “top” is also at risk. This is still true when lots of lubrication is used.
Luckily for butts everywhere, anal sex is no longer the ~taboo~ subject it once was. Which is a good thing! Women who've been there and done that say it's a welcome addition to their sexual repertoire. But just like you must walk before you can run, you must have some sort of anal foreplay before you go for the full monty of anal sex. Or, you know, you can do butt play and leave it at that forever, because it's your booty and you make the rules.
b : of, relating to, or characterized by personality traits (as orderliness, frugality, and obstinacy) considered typical of fixation at the anal stage of development : anal-retentive —often used in nontechnical contexts to describe someone as extremely or excessively neat, careful, or precise — compare genital sense 3, oral sense 3, phallic sense 2
The anus lacks the natural lubrication the vagina has. Penetration can tear the tissue inside the anus, allowing bacteria and viruses to enter the bloodstream. This can result in the spread of sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Studies have suggested that anal exposure to HIV poses 30 times more risk for the receptive partner than vaginal exposure. Exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV) may also lead to the development of anal warts and anal cancer. Using lubricants can help some, but doesn't completely prevent tearing.
21. “I had anal sex with my boyfriend for the first time a month ago. It was my five-year anniversary gift to him and it wasn’t great for me, but I let him keep going because I’m good for my word. When he pulled out after what seemed like a decade, a little poop came out. I was pretty mortified, but my boyfriend made me feel okay about it. I don’t think we’ll be doing it again any time soon, but the experience brought us closer together.” — Lilly, 29
Christian texts may sometimes euphemistically refer to anal sex as the peccatum contra naturam (the sin against nature, after Thomas Aquinas) or Sodomitica luxuria (sodomitical lusts, in one of Charlemagne's ordinances), or peccatum illud horribile, inter christianos non nominandum (that horrible sin that among Christians is not to be named).[130][131][132]
For some women out there, anal sex is the cherry on top of a sexual sundae: a little extra treat that elevates something that was already delicious on its own (duh, talking about sex here). But for others, it's more like pâté: intriguing enough, worth a try, but absolutely not up their alleys (as in, a penis will probably not be going up that alley ever again).
Using a new condom is especially important if you’re switching from anal to vaginal penetration so you can avoid moving bacteria from your anus to your vagina or urethra. Your anus is home to all kinds of bacteria your vagina and related parts aren’t used to—namely, gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, like E. coli. When this bacteria reaches your vagina, it can cause vaginal infections, like bacterial vaginosis, which can lead to vaginal itching, burning during urination, a “fishy” vaginal odor, and gray, white, or green vaginal discharge, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can also spread to your urethra, where it can cause a urinary tract infection. According to the Mayo Clinic, this can cause symptoms like constantly needing to pee, then a burning sensation when you do, along with cloudy urine and pelvic pain.
Oral sex is generally only deemed “likely safe” during pregnancy if you are in a mutually monogamous relationship in which both of you have tested negative for STDs. For those who choose a new sexual partner or have multiple sexual partners during pregnancy, there is the risk of contracting STDs, of which many can negatively affect a pregnancy and the developing fetus.

3. You might think you're pooping, but you are not. The butt is full of nerves (hence, the point of anal play and foreplay), but that doesn't necessarily mean it can tell whether something is going in or out. You can put an end to things at any time, but just know that the feeling you have is probably just from the ~new stimulation~, not a sudden urge to go.
What risk are you talking about? This is an example of why saying “all, always, every”, etc… can make you look stupid. Especially since one form of “safety measure” is abstinence… and if you follow that one I’m REALLY having trouble spotting the risk!!! Not trying to sound like an A$$, but it sounds like the biggest thing you are at risk of is a mundane sex life.
There are two ways that we talk about anal intercourse:  receptive anal intercourse and insertive anal intercourse. “Receptive” refers to the person that is receiving penetration, and “insertive” refers to the person (male) who is providing penetration to the anus. There is also heterosexual versus homosexual anal intercourse; here, since we are concerned with pregnancy, we will mainly focus on heterosexual anal intercourse (man with a woman).

But porn anal, most in the adult industry will gladly tell you, is a fantasy. “Girls train their assholes in order to take the kind of crazy poundings they take on film,” says Skylar Snow, an adult performer who entered the industry last year. That training and prep is different for everyone, but usually it involves acclimating anuses with fingers or toys for hours or days before a scene, and using relaxation tricks. Some take supplements to keep their BMs regular, fasting, popping Imodium, and doing at least one enema in the half-day or day before a scene to minimize the risk of a fecal mishap. “The controlled environment of porn really does help,” says Joseline Kelly, who entered the industry in 2015. "Because, OK, I know I’m going to have anal with this person over here and at this time, so you just feel 100 percent ready” in a way you often can’t in real life.
The human anus (from Latin anus meaning "ring", "circle")[1][2] is the external opening of the rectum. Two sphincters control the exit of feces from the body during an act of defecation, which is the primary function of the anus. These are the internal anal sphincter and the external anal sphincter, which are circular muscles that normally maintain constriction of the orifice and which relaxes as required by normal physiological functioning. The inner sphincter is involuntary and the outer is voluntary. It is located behind the perineum which is located behind the vagina in females and behind the scrotum in males.
Every body is different and there’s not one “right” way to have an orgasm. You might be able to have an orgasm quickly and easily. Or you might need more time or a very specific type of stimulation. You might be able to have an orgasm when you masturbate but not when you have sex with a partner. All of these differences are normal.  Experimenting with what feels good can help you understand your body and what feels good for you.
Get ready for amateur anal footage in front of the webcam and hundreds of horny dolls willing to stretch their holes to the max. 18yo pussy virgins who only take it up the ass and picked up hotties doing backdoor sex on the side of the road. And last but not least, ebony beauties shoving white cocks up their booties in the most incredible interracial scenes.
Silicone Based Lube – Silicone based lube is the lube we recommend you use when having anal sex. It’s compatible with latex condoms, so you won’t degrade them. It also lasts much longer than water-based lube, so you don’t have to worry about reapplying it either. It also feels super silky and smoother than many water-based lubricants. The only slight drawback is that it can sometimes be a little hard to wash out of your bedclothes.
“Awkwardness doesn’t mean you’re not close with your partner or in a healthy relationship, it’s because we’re taught from a young age that sex is a taboo topic,” Levkoff says. “Bringing up to a partner a potential thing that you want to try is going to be uncomfortable regardless of what it is. I think that we forget that a part of sexual intimacy means being vulnerable and being able to have those conversations. That’s a human thing. It’s part of being sexually mature.”
Anal sex can expose its participants to two principal dangers: infections due to the high number of infectious microorganisms not found elsewhere on the body, and physical damage to the anus and rectum due to their fragility.[14][16] Unprotected penile-anal penetration, colloquially known as barebacking,[73] carries a higher risk of passing on sexually transmitted infections (STIs/STDs) because the anal sphincter is a delicate, easily torn tissue that can provide an entry for pathogens.[14][16] The high concentration of white blood cells around the rectum, together with the risk of tearing and the colon's function to absorb fluid, are what place those who engage in anal sex at high risk of STIs.[16] Use of condoms, ample lubrication to reduce the risk of tearing,[2][41] and safer sex practices in general, reduce the risk of STI transmission.[16][74] However, a condom can break or otherwise come off during anal sex, and this is more likely to happen with anal sex than with other sex acts because of the tightness of the anal sphincters during friction.[16]
Signs and symptoms of STDs in men Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), or sexually transmitted infections (STIs), can affect anyone, but some symptoms are different for men and women. In this article, we look at the signs and symptoms of common STIs in men and when they typically occur. We also discuss how to diagnose, prevent, and treat STIs in men. Read now
Anastasia Rose : I always recommend starting with toys. There is a five-step silicone butt plug kit I highly recommend. It’s on Amazon! But also, vibrating anal toys! Try them, I promise you’ll be an anal slut in no time. I also recommend maybe starting with one finger, then two, then maybe three. The key to all of this is just to relax. Breathe steadily. Trust yourself. And if it hurts, stop.

I think the fear of pain for anal is understandable it is a true sense of fear I honestly had it for a long time because I had a previous partner before my husband tear me cause he went to vigorous so I understand the fear of anal it’s the more logical fear to meat otherwise this article was helpful with helping figure out how to overcome the pain I had previous in anal so thank you very much it helped
Categories: English terms borrowed from LatinEnglish terms derived from LatinEnglish 2-syllable wordsEnglish terms with IPA pronunciationEnglish lemmasEnglish adjectivesen:Psychoanalysisen:Psychologyen:EntomologyEnglish nounsEnglish uncountable nounsEnglish countable nounsEnglish informal termsBreton lemmasBreton nounsFrench terms borrowed from LatinFrench terms derived from LatinFrench words suffixed with -alFrench 2-syllable wordsFrench terms with IPA pronunciationFrench terms with audio linksFrench lemmasFrench adjectivesGerman terms borrowed from LatinGerman terms derived from LatinGerman 2-syllable wordsGerman terms with IPA pronunciationGerman terms with audio linksGerman lemmasGerman adjectivesGerman uncomparable adjectivesPortuguese terms inherited from LatinPortuguese terms derived from LatinPortuguese words suffixed with -alPortuguese lemmasPortuguese adjectivesPortuguese terms with obsolete sensesPortuguese nounsPortuguese terms borrowed from LatinPortuguese terms with multiple etymologiesRomanian terms borrowed from FrenchRomanian terms derived from FrenchRomanian terms borrowed from LatinRomanian terms derived from LatinRomanian terms with IPA pronunciationRomanian lemmasRomanian adjectivesSpanish terms with IPA pronunciationSpanish terms borrowed from LatinSpanish terms derived from LatinSpanish lemmasSpanish adjectivesSpanish doubletsSpanish nounsSpanish terms with multiple etymologiesSpanish 2-syllable words

19. If you try it a few times and hate it, don't keep trying it because you think it'll eventually be tolerable. "Assuming you have a considerate lover who's invested in you feeling good, I think you'd know within the first five times whether you like it or not," Kerner says, explaining that this depends on a variety of factors. "I've encountered women who hated receiving oral sex initially but love it now, and it was because they were self-conscious. It depends on your levels of inhibition, your feelings about your partner, your feelings about your body. If all these things are good to go, and you just don't like the sensation, you'll know pretty fast."

8. Try it on your own first. You know how it's basically impossible to tickle yourself? This isn't the same, but trying out anal foreplay on your own is informed by a similar mind-set. You won't be surprised as much by your own, um, touch. It won't be the same as it would be coming from a partner, but it's a good way to feel out if you're into the sensation.

Receptive anal sex is much riskier for getting HIV. The bottom partner is 13 times more likely to get infected than the top. However, it’s possible for either partner to get HIV through anal sex from certain body fluids—blood, semen (cum), pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum), or rectal fluids—of a person who has HIV. Using condoms or medicines to protect against transmission can decrease this risk.
So, if you never want to try it or if you’ve tried it once and didn’t enjoy it, then the obvious but important anal sex tip I have for you is that you shouldn’t feel that you have to keep doing it with your man. If your sex life consists of you doing things that you don’t want to do, then it’s not going to be a particularly satisfying one. Like I mentioned previously, there are plenty more things you can do with your man.
A fungus, like the one that causes most vaginal yeast infections, can also cause anal itching. And certain kinds of bacteria can, too. For example, a staph skin infection can happen almost anywhere, including the area around your anus. And the same kind of bacteria that causes strep throat can trigger a red, itchy rash around the anus. This is more common in kids than adults.
Your man also needs to be someone who will actually follow your instructions too. If he thinks he is going to be in control and calling the shots, then you are going to have to bring him down to earth and let him know that this won’t be the case. Doing this isn’t so that you can “dominate” your man, it’s so that you get to experience the pleasures of anal sex AND NOT THE PAIN.
She recommends buying the disposable plastic bottles at drug stores, but emptying out the solution that comes with it because you don’t actually need a chemical laxative. Once you have the bottle, rinse it out several times, fill it with warm water (cold water can cause cramping), and follow the instructions for how to use it. Then do it a few times prior to anal sex.
1. Relax those booty muscles. There are a bunch of li'l muscles around your anus that can be pretty tight if you're not relaxed. And as logic follows, if those muscles and your anal sphincter are tight, inserting anything can be painful and difficult rather than pleasurable and easy. Try something like deep breathing or a relaxing massage with your partner to make sure both you and your bum muscles are sufficiently chilled out, pre-anal play.
There are two ways that we talk about anal intercourse:  receptive anal intercourse and insertive anal intercourse. “Receptive” refers to the person that is receiving penetration, and “insertive” refers to the person (male) who is providing penetration to the anus. There is also heterosexual versus homosexual anal intercourse; here, since we are concerned with pregnancy, we will mainly focus on heterosexual anal intercourse (man with a woman).
If you’re using a sex toy with a partner, it’s important to have safer sex to help prevent STDs. If someone who has an STD uses a sex toy, the body fluids on that toy can spread the infection to another person who uses that toy. So wash any sex toys with mild soap and water after you use them and before they touch another person’s genitals. You can also put condoms on sex toys to keep them clean and prevent the spread of STDs — just change condoms before the toy touches another person’s genitals. And never put a sex toy that’s been in a butt into a vagina or mouth without washing it or changing the condom first. Butt germs can cause STDs and other infections.
^ Randy P. Conner; David Hatfield Sparks; Mariya Sparks (2006) [1997]. Cassell's Encyclopedia of Queer Myth, Symbol, and Spirit: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Lore. Cassell. pp. 20, 216. ISBN 0304337609. Retrieved September 15, 2014. Indeed, homoeroticism in general and anal intercourse in particular are referred to as liwat, while those (primarily men) engaging in these behaviors are referred to as qaum Lut or Luti, 'the people of Lot.'
According to a 2010 study from the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB) that was authored by Debby Herbenick et al., although anal intercourse is reported by fewer women than other partnered sex behaviors, partnered women in the age groups between 18–49 are significantly more likely to report having anal sex in the past 90 days. Women engaged in anal intercourse less commonly than men. Vaginal intercourse was practiced more than insertive anal intercourse among men, but 13% to 15% of men aged 25 to 49 practiced insertive anal intercourse.[50][51]
×