14. Like peeing immediately after sex to avoid a UTI, it's good to go to the bathroom right after you're done. You'll also probably feel like you have to anyway. You have also opened yourself up to the joy of butt queefs. They're not farts, no matter what anyone says. Unlike frontal queefs, they might go on for a few hours as the air escapes. On the bright side, you are a human beatbox, and your partner can lay a sick freestyle over the top if s/he feels so inclined.

Take things slowly, use plenty of lubrication, and stop if it becomes too painful. Don’t aim to have full penis penetration your first go-round. Try using a finger, and then upgrade to two or three fingers. A toy might be a good option, too, as you grow more comfortable with the sensation. After the first time or two, you and your partner will likely find that the pleasure trumps any initial discomforts.
13. You can lie flat on your stomach, get in doggy-style, or do missionary—and that is the order of what will hurt the least to the most. At least, in my (minimal) experience. You can tear your anus if you use a certain position that allows for more penetration before you're ready, and Taormino points out that the missionary position allows for the least clitoral stimulation and suggests receiver-on-top for beginners. "Insertive partners who are inexperienced, nervous about how to penetrate their partners anally, or fearful of hurting their partners may find this position most relaxing because the receiver can do much of the decision-making and work."
Anal sex can feel stimulating and pleasurable for both the person giving and receiving - but it can also take a while to get used to the sensation of it. If it doesn’t go perfectly the first time you can always try again when you’re both in the mood. Remember that you can pause or stop at any point you want. Just because you have started something doesn’t mean you need to continue – stopping is actually very normal.
Research indicates that anal sex occurs significantly less frequently than other sexual behaviors,[1] but its association with dominance and submission, as well as taboo, makes it an appealing stimulus to people of all sexual orientations.[5][18][19] In addition to sexual penetration by the penis, people may use sex toys such as butt plugs or anal beads, engage in fingering, anilingus, pegging, anal masturbation or fisting for anal sexual activity, and different sex positions may also be included.[5][20] Fisting is the least practiced of the activities,[21] partly because it is uncommon that people can relax enough to accommodate an object as big as a fist being inserted into the anus.[5]
If you're playing with silicone-based toys and need a water-based lube, Sliquid Sassy is a great option that's specifically intended for anal play. It's got a thicker texture than many water-based lubes as a result — almost gel-like — to offer you all the lubrication you need. As with all water-based lubes, it'll dry out faster than silicone, but a little bit of water splashed on the right area will "re-activate" it if you need a boost when it comes to the slippery factor.
9. This is a case where shower or bathtub sex might actually be good. Usually, shower sex is bad and very hard to successfully pull off. But because relaxation is so key here, trying anal play in a place where you're more likely to feel calm and loose is helpful. Plus, if you're worried about cleanliness (which isn't a real problem, but it's an understandable concern), moving things to a place where you're already getting clean helps out.
Many men also like having their prostate stimulated. The prostate is a walnut-sized gland located just below the bladder and is highly sensitive to stimulation (usually gentle finger stimulation through the anus). However, there are many blood vessels in and around the prostate and it can get bruised if handled roughly, so always treat it gently and use lots of lube.

Unprotected receptive anal sex (with an HIV positive partner) is the sex act most likely to result in HIV transmission.[14][15][16] Other infections that can be transmitted by unprotected anal sex are human papillomavirus (HPV) (which can increase risk of anal cancer[75]); typhoid fever;[76] amoebiasis; chlamydia;[15] cryptosporidiosis; E. coli infections; giardiasis; gonorrhea;[15] hepatitis A; hepatitis B; hepatitis C; herpes simplex;[15] Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8);[77] lymphogranuloma venereum; Mycoplasma hominis; Mycoplasma genitalium; pubic lice;[15] salmonellosis; shigella; syphilis;[15] tuberculosis; and Ureaplasma urealyticum.[78]

^ Jump up to: a b c Kilchevsky A, Vardi Y, Lowenstein L, Gruenwald I (January 2012). "Is the Female G-Spot Truly a Distinct Anatomic Entity?". The Journal of Sexual Medicine. 9 (3): 719–26. doi:10.1111/j.1743-6109.2011.02623.x. PMID 22240236. Lay summary – G-Spot Does Not Exist, 'Without A Doubt,' Say Researchers - The Huffington Post (19 January 2012).
Different types of treatments are available for patients with anal cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.
These days though, butt play is hot. Whether it’s Marnie getting rimmed on the hit HBO show Girls, or Harvard University offering an ‘Anal Sex 101’ workshop during their annual ‘Sex Week’, anal sex has decidedly outgrown its verboten past. A 2010 study published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine found that some 40 per cent of women ages 20-24 have engaged in anal sex at least once. And more than half have probably played around with oral or digital stimulation, whether on the giving or the receiving end.
1. Don't try it if you don't want to. There's a big difference between "I don't necessarily fantasize about getting a penis enema but I want to blow my partner's mind" and "I would rather die than do this but I guess I can suffer through it because he's been pressuring me." If you're in a mutually caring, healthy relationship (with a guy who goes down on you for half an hour, minimum), maybe you'll want to do it for your partner or you won't. Either way is 100 percent fine, and if he keeps pressuring you when you have made it clear that it is not on the table, tell him to suck it.
×