A fungus, like the one that causes most vaginal yeast infections, can also cause anal itching. And certain kinds of bacteria can, too. For example, a staph skin infection can happen almost anywhere, including the area around your anus. And the same kind of bacteria that causes strep throat can trigger a red, itchy rash around the anus. This is more common in kids than adults.

FYI to any haters she likes being tied up, handcuffed, slapped, called slutty names and choked even when sober so no comments about how I took advantage of her drunkenness. I think if she gets into anal she’ll probably want all that and and solid anal pounding. I’m not the one into the choking or pain that’s all her fetish. I just like a good morning blow job I’m actually a bit of a prude other than anal haha but I oblige her, you gotta give to get 😉

Anal sex can expose its participants to two principal dangers: infections due to the high number of infectious microorganisms not found elsewhere on the body, and physical damage to the anus and rectum due to their fragility.[14][16] Unprotected penile-anal penetration, colloquially known as barebacking,[73] carries a higher risk of passing on sexually transmitted infections (STIs/STDs) because the anal sphincter is a delicate, easily torn tissue that can provide an entry for pathogens.[14][16] The high concentration of white blood cells around the rectum, together with the risk of tearing and the colon's function to absorb fluid, are what place those who engage in anal sex at high risk of STIs.[16] Use of condoms, ample lubrication to reduce the risk of tearing,[2][41] and safer sex practices in general, reduce the risk of STI transmission.[16][74] However, a condom can break or otherwise come off during anal sex, and this is more likely to happen with anal sex than with other sex acts because of the tightness of the anal sphincters during friction.[16]
The development of the anus was an important stage in the evolution of multicellular animals. It appears to have happened at least twice, following different paths in protostomes and deuterostomes. This accompanied or facilitated other important evolutionary developments: the bilaterian body plan, the coelom, and metamerism, in which the body was built of repeated "modules" which could later specialize, such as the heads of most arthropods, which are composed of fused, specialized segments.
In a male receptive partner, being anally penetrated can produce a pleasurable sensation due to the inserted penis rubbing or brushing against the prostate through the anal wall.[4][11] This can result in pleasurable sensations and can lead to an orgasm in some cases.[4][11] Prostate stimulation can produce a deeper orgasm, sometimes described by men as more widespread and intense, longer-lasting, and allowing for greater feelings of ecstasy than orgasm elicited by penile stimulation only.[4][11] The prostate is located next to the rectum and is the larger, more developed male homologue (variation) to the female Skene's glands.[22] It is also typical for a man to not reach orgasm as a receptive partner solely from anal sex.[23][24]
Signs and symptoms of STDs in men Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), or sexually transmitted infections (STIs), can affect anyone, but some symptoms are different for men and women. In this article, we look at the signs and symptoms of common STIs in men and when they typically occur. We also discuss how to diagnose, prevent, and treat STIs in men. Read now
The risk of getting HIV varies widely depending on the type of sexual activity. Anal sex (intercourse), which involves inserting the penis into the anus, carries the highest risk of transmitting HIV if either partner is HIV-positive. You can lower your risk for getting and transmitting HIV by using condoms the right way every time you have sex; choosing lower risk sexual activities; taking daily medicine to prevent HIV, called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); and taking medicines to treat HIV if you have HIV, called antiretroviral therapy (ART).
People who are HIV-negative and at very high risk for HIV can take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), if taken consistently, can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Since PrEP is not 100% effective at preventing HIV, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk. Only condoms can help protect against other STDs.
The anal sphincter acts as a bit of a gatekeeper for the rectum. For anal sex, however, it’s important that this muscle relaxes. Not only does it make the experience more pleasurable, it reduces the risk of tearing or discomfort. Relaxation involves patience, both at the time you’re attempting penetration, and as you become more accustomed to anal sex.
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