Amphibians, reptiles, and birds use the same orifice (known as the cloaca) for excreting liquid and solid wastes, for copulation and egg-laying. Monotreme mammals also have a cloaca, which is thought to be a feature inherited from the earliest amniotes via the therapsids. Marsupials have a single orifice for excreting both solids and liquids and, in females, a separate vagina for reproduction. Female placental mammals have completely separate orifices for defecation, urination, and reproduction; males have one opening for defecation and another for both urination and reproduction, although the channels flowing to that orifice are almost completely separate.
These cancers start in cells in the skin or anal lining that make the brown pigment called melanin. Only a very small portion of anal cancers are melanomas. Melanomas are far more common on the skin in other parts of the body. If melanomas are found at an early stage (before they have grown deeply into the skin or spread to lymph nodes) they can be removed with surgery, and the outlook for long-term survival is very good. But because anal melanomas are hard to see, most are found at a later stage. If possible, the entire tumor is removed with surgery. If all of the tumor can be removed, a cure is possible. If the melanoma has spread too far to be removed completely, other treatments may be given. For more on this, see Melanoma Skin Cancer.
There are two ways that we talk about anal intercourse:  receptive anal intercourse and insertive anal intercourse. “Receptive” refers to the person that is receiving penetration, and “insertive” refers to the person (male) who is providing penetration to the anus. There is also heterosexual versus homosexual anal intercourse; here, since we are concerned with pregnancy, we will mainly focus on heterosexual anal intercourse (man with a woman).
Unfortunately, there’s a bit of a catch here. When you poop, your body should expel all the stool in your rectum, but some fecal matter might get left behind. While you probably don’t have to worry about pooping on your partner, you should know that they may be exposed to some visible or invisible fecal matter, Dr. Chinn says. No one needs to panic. It’s as simple as washing it off with soap and water (or changing the condom), washing your hands, and continuing on with your life, whether or not that means getting back to anal sex. But it’s definitely something that all parties should be aware of before you start.
Luckily for butts everywhere, anal sex is no longer the ~taboo~ subject it once was. Which is a good thing! Women who've been there and done that say it's a welcome addition to their sexual repertoire. But just like you must walk before you can run, you must have some sort of anal foreplay before you go for the full monty of anal sex. Or, you know, you can do butt play and leave it at that forever, because it's your booty and you make the rules.

Oral sex is generally only deemed “likely safe” during pregnancy if you are in a mutually monogamous relationship in which both of you have tested negative for STDs. For those who choose a new sexual partner or have multiple sexual partners during pregnancy, there is the risk of contracting STDs, of which many can negatively affect a pregnancy and the developing fetus.


Different types of treatments are available for patients with anal cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.
Strong views are often expressed about anal sex. It is controversial in various cultures, especially with regard to religious prohibitions. This is commonly due to prohibitions against anal sex among males or teachings about the procreative purpose of sexual activity.[5][7] It may be considered taboo or unnatural, and is a criminal offense in some countries, punishable by corporal or capital punishment.[5][7] By contrast, people also see anal sex as a natural and valid form of sexual activity that may be as fulfilling as other desired sexual expressions, and as an enhancing or primary element of their sex lives.[5][7]
Unless you're fluid-bonded with your partner (meaning that you've both been tested for STIs, have been cleared, and aren't having sex with anyone else), there's risk for contracting STIs with any type of unprotected sex — including anal. "Unprotected anal intercourse is high-risk for many sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea, HIV, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes, HPV, and hepatitis," according to Planned Parenthood. So, please use condoms. Even if you're using a strap-on, it's important to use condoms if the toy has been used with multiple partners.
Gay men who prefer anal sex may view it as their version of intercourse and a natural expression of intimacy that is capable of providing pleasure.[19][53][57] The notion that it might resonate with gay men with the same emotional significance that vaginal sex resonates with heterosexuals has also been considered.[57][58] Some men who have sex with men, however, believe that being a receptive partner during anal sex questions their masculinity.[59][60]
Stimulation from anal sex can additionally be affected by popular perception or portrayals of the activity, such as erotica or pornography. In pornography, anal sex is commonly portrayed as a desirable, painless routine that does not require personal lubricant; this can result in couples performing anal sex without care, and men and women believing that it is unusual for women, as receptive partners, to find discomfort or pain instead of pleasure from the activity.[6][38][39][40] By contrast, each person's sphincter muscles react to penetration differently, the anal sphincters have tissues that are more prone to tearing, and the anus and rectum do not provide lubrication for sexual penetration like the vagina does. Researchers say adequate application of a personal lubricant, relaxation, and communication between sexual partners are crucial to avoid pain or damage to the anus or rectum.[2][13][41] Additionally, ensuring that the anal area is clean and the bowel is empty, for both aesthetics and practicality, may be desired by participants.[21]
If you would like to reproduce some or all of this content, see Reuse of NCI Information for guidance about copyright and permissions. In the case of permitted digital reproduction, please credit the National Cancer Institute as the source and link to the original NCI product using the original product's title; e.g., “Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version was originally published by the National Cancer Institute.”
6. “I’m probably an outlier on the spectrum of “tightness” that I enjoy, in that I actually don’t enjoy a tight pussy. I don’t jerk off with a tight squeeze – very, very light in fact with a LOT of lube. That being said, the best blow job for me is the kind where the woman’s mouth is loosely mocking a wet, slimy cave that you park a Prius in. I just want to feel the sliding and wetness. When it comes to pussy, I love it, but my favorite is pounding my GF with a large dildo (which she loves) and being the last to be inside of her, after she’s all loosened up. You know that old saying, ‘It’s like throwing a hotdog down a hallway’? I actually prefer that. I’m not sure why, psychologically, but it just feels great to me to be flopping around in there. So, when it comes to anal, all of those descriptions are exactly what its like. It’s open. It’s wet (with a lot of lube, of course), it’s slimy, and it’s unconstricted.”
People who are HIV-negative and at very high risk for HIV can take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), if taken consistently, can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Since PrEP is not 100% effective at preventing HIV, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk. Only condoms can help protect against other STDs.
Many men also like having their prostate stimulated. The prostate is a walnut-sized gland located just below the bladder and is highly sensitive to stimulation (usually gentle finger stimulation through the anus). However, there are many blood vessels in and around the prostate and it can get bruised if handled roughly, so always treat it gently and use lots of lube.
In the majority of cases, a colostomy is not required, as many cancers can be cured with chemotherapy and radiation alone. A colostomy may be needed if the tumor does not respond well to therapy or recurs after treatment. For advanced anal cancers or unusual types, the surgeon may need to remove the rectum and anus and create a permanent colostomy. Sometimes this is the only way to remove all the cancer cells.

16. That being said, you can totally clean things up. The key to anal play is comfort, so do whatever you need to help with any lingering anxiety. "Using an anal douche is not harmful if only done once in awhile and might help you relax your concerns about your bowels," advises Pierce. You can use something as simple as warm water for a quick cleanse too.
5. You're gonna wanna be vocal during this process. Even if you're normally very quiet during sex, this is a time you'll wanna speak up—especially your first time trying it out with a new partner. Tell them if they're going too fast (or too slow—see point 10 below), if you feel like you're literally about to poop everywhere, or if you're experiencing pain/discomfort. Also, tell them if it feels good! If you're feeling nervous, chances are your partner is, too. Positive feedback—we love it!
×