Chlamydia and erectile dysfunction: What's the link? Some people who have chlamydia also experience erectile dysfunction (ED), which involves problems getting or maintaining an erection. Chlamydia can infect the prostate gland, leading to prostatitis, pain, and ED. In this article, learn more about the link between this common infection and ED, and treatments for both. Read now
Maybe you're super excited to try anal and you want to get right in there — don't. It's always best to start slowly with a new sexual experience, but is especially important when you're trying anal sex because the sphincter muscles in an anus are tightly closed. So, instead of jumping in with a penis or sex toy, have your partner stick one (lubed up!) finger inside your rectum first. Then, slowly add more fingers until you're ready to move on to penetration with a penis or with a strap-on.
The other benefit of starting slow is that you'll build arousal, Pitagora says. "Use slow and gentle stimulation of the area around the anus, the anus, the area just inside the anus, and of the prostate (if your partner has one)," they say. Being fully aroused makes any sexual experience better, but in the case of anal sex it will also help you relax.
With anal sex, the anus can play a role in sexuality. Attitudes towards anal sex vary and it is illegal in some countries.[3] The anus is often considered a taboo part of the body,[3] and it is known by a large number of usually vulgar slang terms. The anus is also the site of potential infections and other conditions, including cancer.[citation needed] The traditional polite synonym for anus was fundament, though this euphemism is rarely heard now that medical terms are widely acceptable.
Spreading STIs. Infections and diseases that are shared during sexual intercourse — such as HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and herpes — can be shared through anal sex. In fact, anal sex is the sexual behavior for transmitting and getting HIV for both men and women. People on the receiving end (or “the bottom”) of anal sex are more likely to become infected with HIV than the inserting partner (or “the top”).
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