^ Bryan Strong; Christine DeVault; Theodore F. Cohen (2010). The Marriage and Family Experience: Intimate Relationship in a Changing Society. Cengage Learning. p. 186. ISBN 0-534-62425-1. Retrieved October 8, 2011. Most people agree that we maintain virginity as long as we refrain from sexual (vaginal) intercourse. But occasionally we hear people speak of 'technical virginity' [...] Data indicate that 'a very significant proportion of teens ha[ve] had experience with oral sex, even if they haven't had sexual intercourse, and may think of themselves as virgins' [...] Other research, especially research looking into virginity loss, reports that 35% of virgins, defined as people who have never engaged in vaginal intercourse, have nonetheless engaged in one or more other forms of heterosexual sexual activity (e.g., oral sex, anal sex, or mutual masturbation).
5. You're gonna wanna be vocal during this process. Even if you're normally very quiet during sex, this is a time you'll wanna speak up—especially your first time trying it out with a new partner. Tell them if they're going too fast (or too slow—see point 10 below), if you feel like you're literally about to poop everywhere, or if you're experiencing pain/discomfort. Also, tell them if it feels good! If you're feeling nervous, chances are your partner is, too. Positive feedback—we love it!
Now that you know how to have anal sex with your man that is both satisfying and fun, my suggestion is that you read the next chapter in the Anal Sex Guide on how to prepare for anal sex. After that, make sure to check out the best anal sex positions and then learn how to eat ass (it can be very pleasurable and super kinky). And if your man is keen on anal play, then make sure you learn how to give him a prostate massage.
Your nerve endings are sensitive for a reason. They alert your brain to pain so you can prevent yourself from getting seriously injured, Dr. Chinn says. While numbing creams might make anal penetration feel easier, they don’t make it any easier physically. By numbing your anus, you or your partner could be pushing your body past its point of comfort without even realizing it.

Anal intercourse is sometimes used as a substitute for vaginal intercourse during menstruation.[5] The likelihood of pregnancy occurring during anal sex is greatly reduced, as anal sex alone cannot lead to pregnancy unless sperm is somehow transported to the vaginal opening. Because of this, some couples practice anal intercourse as a form of contraception, often in the absence of a condom.[5][38][44]
^ Jump up to: a b See here and pages 48–49 for the majority of researchers and heterosexuals defining virginity loss/"technical virginity" by whether or not a person has engaged in vaginal sex. Laura M. Carpenter (2005). Virginity lost: an intimate portrait of first sexual experiences. NYU Press. pp. 295 pages. ISBN 978-0-8147-1652-6. Retrieved October 9, 2011.
"Another thing I have heard from many women is that from the anatomical point of view there simply can be no pleasure out of anal sex for women," says Singer. Seriously. "'There's nothing up there that can actually make it feel good.' Although this simply isn't true (there are actually more nerve bundles in the rectum than in the vaginal cavity), a great number of women rely on this as one of their reasons for not wanting to engage in anal sex."
For comfort in entering anally, it works to be really turned on before anal entry. Deep kissing, squeezing nipples, rubbing the vulva and having vaginal sex for a few minutes first really helps to relax the anal muscles. Using lots of lubricant, the penis can push slowly, and if there is any tightness at all, withdraw and wait until the woman feels ready to do it again. The second time again entering slowly will be more relaxed and ready. If the woman rubs her vulva hard as entry happens it will more likely be pleasurable . If not, withdraw and try again when ready. Certainly it helps to have a caring partner who you can trust to be gentle. Once you are warmed up you can go pretty hard and it’s likely to give you a really great orgasm, more than you get vaginally.

Yep — pregnancy. In order for someone to become pregnant, sperm needs to make it into the vagina (and then through the cervix and into the uterus, etc.), and that could be possible (though unlikely) depending on what position you’re in, she explains. So ejaculating in someone’s butt probably isn’t the best idea if you're not also using another form of birth control.
A clinical trial is a study to answer a scientific question, such as whether one treatment is better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned in the laboratory. Each trial answers certain scientific questions in order to find new and better ways to help cancer patients. During treatment clinical trials, information is collected about the effects of a new treatment and how well it works. If a clinical trial shows that a new treatment is better than one currently being used, the new treatment may become "standard." Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.
Anal sex, though often stigmatized, is a perfectly natural way to engage in sexual activity. People have been having anal sex since the dawn of humanity. Seriously, it's been documented back to the ancient Greeks and then some. So if you’re a little worried about trying it or are having trouble understanding the appeal, just know that it isn’t weird or gross.

^ Ken Plummer (2002). Modern Homosexualities: Fragments of Lesbian and Gay Experiences. Routledge. pp. 187–191. ISBN 1134922426. Retrieved August 24, 2013. The social construction of 'sex' as vaginal intercourse affects how other forms of sexual activity are evaluated as sexually satisfying or arousing; in some cases whether an activity is seen as a sexual act at all. For example, unless a woman has been penetrated by a man's penis she is still technically a virgin even if she has had lots of sexual experience.
Physician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.
Using protection during anal sex is important to reduce your risk of catching an STI. For penetrative sex, make sure you use a condom and lots of lube – some people feel safer using extra-thick condoms for anal sex. Dental dams also offer good protection for rimming. Taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is another way to prevent HIV infection, but it may not be available everywhere.
Me and my husband like having sex like daily using techniques i learned from sean but anal sex sometimes we wait a few days or weeks in between sometines not however when its been awhile it does hurt for like 10 seconds when he does penetrate sometimes he does use his fingers when I give him a blow job other tines he just gently penetrates but we never use lube or condoms i hate the feeling of condoms but What can I do to make it less painful that first 10 seconds and to make me actually orgams like a OMG orgams because from anal I never received a mind blowing orgasms
Not all agree on how to do anal in real life. They are unanimous on the value of a ton of lube and gradual exploration. But some stars believe in a degree of prep work even in real life, while others believe it can be done well spontaneously, in the heat of the sexual moment. And not all of their advice will be relevant to everyone, as every asshole has different needs and levels of resilience. Stars like Sartre and longtime anal expert Joanna Angel, for instance, feel like their vaginas fatigue from frequent or rough sex faster than their asses; Angel told me her body seems so well built for anal she doesn’t need to stretch even to prep for hardcore scenes. Other people, DeVille cautions, may be at higher risk of injuries than others. And most of the adult stars I’ve spoken to over the years about the topic agree that, for some people, anal just might not be a good fit. But the advice they offer below on how to approach anal sex, especially as a beginner, is a great jumping off point for individual exploration into the great anal beyond.
Unprotected receptive anal sex (with an HIV positive partner) is the sex act most likely to result in HIV transmission.[14][15][16] Other infections that can be transmitted by unprotected anal sex are human papillomavirus (HPV) (which can increase risk of anal cancer[75]); typhoid fever;[76] amoebiasis; chlamydia;[15] cryptosporidiosis; E. coli infections; giardiasis; gonorrhea;[15] hepatitis A; hepatitis B; hepatitis C; herpes simplex;[15] Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8);[77] lymphogranuloma venereum; Mycoplasma hominis; Mycoplasma genitalium; pubic lice;[15] salmonellosis; shigella; syphilis;[15] tuberculosis; and Ureaplasma urealyticum.[78]
The anus (from Latin anus meaning "ring", "circle") is an opening at the opposite end of an animal's digestive tract from the mouth. Its function is to control the expulsion of feces, unwanted semi-solid matter produced during digestion, which, depending on the type of animal, may include: matter which the animal cannot digest, such as bones;[1] food material after all the nutrients have been extracted, for example cellulose or lignin; ingested matter which would be toxic if it remained in the digestive tract; and dead or excess gut bacteria and other endosymbionts.
In addition to HIV, a person can get other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) like chlamydia and gonorrhea from anal sex without condoms. Even if a condom is used, some STDs can still be transmitted through skin-to-skin contact (like syphilis or herpes). One can also get hepatitis A, B, and C; parasites like Giardia and intestinal amoebas; and bacteria like Shigella, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and E. coli from anal sex without a condom because they’re transmitted through feces. Getting tested and treated for STDs reduces a person’s chances of getting or transmitting HIV through anal sex. If one has never had hepatitis A or B, there are vaccines to prevent them. A health care provider can make recommendations about vaccines.
1. Relax those booty muscles. There are a bunch of li'l muscles around your anus that can be pretty tight if you're not relaxed. And as logic follows, if those muscles and your anal sphincter are tight, inserting anything can be painful and difficult rather than pleasurable and easy. Try something like deep breathing or a relaxing massage with your partner to make sure both you and your bum muscles are sufficiently chilled out, pre-anal play.
Please explain the risk if you follow ALL safety measures (off the top of my head here are just a few of them to consider): Condom, lots of lube to help prevent condom breakage (and most women I know don’t like dry anal), go slow until things are “ready”, used a toy to stretch things a little bit first, both partners got tested, did your best not to “contaminate” the vagina, were on birth control (in case the condom broke & it was that time of the month & the sperm spread to the vagina), immediately cleaned up, both washed hands immediately and took showers immediately afterwards, cleaned the sheets properly, etc… So if you do all of that, what “very risky” issues are we talking about???

Reduce your risk of cutting or scratching your partner by trimming your nails. Long nails might tear the thin, delicate tissue of the anus, which could lead to bleeding. It also increases the risk of spreading bacteria that could cause infections. Be sure to wash your hands well and scrub under your nails after anal sex, too, especially before inserting them into the vagina or mouth.
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