For people with HIV, HIV medicine (called antiretroviral therapy or ART) can reduce the amount of virus in the blood and body fluids to very low levels, if taken as prescribed. This is called viral suppression—usually defined as having less than 200 copies of HIV per milliliter of blood. HIV medicine can even make the viral load so low that a test can’t detect it. This is called an undetectable viral load. People who take HIV medicine as prescribed and get and stay virally suppressed or undetectable can stay healthy for many years, and they have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to an HIV-negative partner through sex. Only condoms can help protect against some other STDs.

3. You might think you're pooping, but you are not. The butt is full of nerves (hence, the point of anal play and foreplay), but that doesn't necessarily mean it can tell whether something is going in or out. You can put an end to things at any time, but just know that the feeling you have is probably just from the ~new stimulation~, not a sudden urge to go.
The abundance of nerve endings in the anal region and rectum can make anal sex pleasurable for men or women.[4][2][5] The internal and external sphincter muscles control the opening and closing of the anus; these muscles, which are sensitive membranes made up of many nerve endings, facilitate pleasure or pain during anal sex.[2][5] The Human Sexuality: An Encyclopedia states that "the inner third of the anal canal is less sensitive to touch than the outer two-thirds, but is more sensitive to pressure" and that "the rectum is a curved tube about eight or nine inches long and has the capacity, like the anus, to expand".[5]

I think the fear of pain for anal is understandable it is a true sense of fear I honestly had it for a long time because I had a previous partner before my husband tear me cause he went to vigorous so I understand the fear of anal it’s the more logical fear to meat otherwise this article was helpful with helping figure out how to overcome the pain I had previous in anal so thank you very much it helped


If you’re going ver-r-r-y slowly and using lots of lube, but it’s still not happening, don’t fret. There are plenty of other ways to have fun back there; there’s no need to be too hung up on penetration. But who knows? After a little tongue and finger play, you might just be warmed up enough to try again. You can also try an ‘anal easing’ lubricant, designed to gently relax the anal area for easy insertion, like this one:
Kimmie KaBoom: I also am against people using poppers or pills to relax muscles for the same reasons. [And] remember to practice safe sex, because STDs can still be transmitted anally, too. [Note: The fragility of anal wall tissue makes micro tears more likely, increasing the risk of sexually transmitted disease transmission significantly versus vaginal sex.]
In later Roman-era Greek poetry, anal sex became a common literary convention, represented as taking place with "eligible" youths: those who had attained the proper age but had not yet become adults. Seducing those not of proper age (for example, non-adolescent children) into the practice was considered very shameful for the adult, and having such relations with a male who was no longer adolescent was considered more shameful for the young male than for the one mounting him; Greek courtesans, or hetaerae, are said to have frequently practiced male-female anal intercourse as a means of preventing pregnancy.[114]
13. You can lie flat on your stomach, get in doggy-style, or do missionary—and that is the order of what will hurt the least to the most. At least, in my (minimal) experience. You can tear your anus if you use a certain position that allows for more penetration before you're ready, and Taormino points out that the missionary position allows for the least clitoral stimulation and suggests receiver-on-top for beginners. "Insertive partners who are inexperienced, nervous about how to penetrate their partners anally, or fearful of hurting their partners may find this position most relaxing because the receiver can do much of the decision-making and work."
The human anus (from Latin anus meaning "ring", "circle")[1][2] is the external opening of the rectum. Two sphincters control the exit of feces from the body during an act of defecation, which is the primary function of the anus. These are the internal anal sphincter and the external anal sphincter, which are circular muscles that normally maintain constriction of the orifice and which relaxes as required by normal physiological functioning. The inner sphincter is involuntary and the outer is voluntary. It is located behind the perineum which is located behind the vagina in females and behind the scrotum in males.

The tissue and skin around the anus acts as a protective barrier for the bottom half of your digestive tract. However, the tissue inside the anus is thinner, delicate, and more likely to tear and bleed as a result of penetration. This increases the likelihood of passing infections, viruses, or bacteria between partners. Even two partners who don’t have any sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can still pass bacteria between each other through these tears in the skin.
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