A small number of anal cancers are known as adenocarcinomas. These start in cells that line the upper part of the anus near the rectum. They can also start in the glands under the anal mucosa that release secretions into the anal canal. Most anal adenocarcinomas are treated the same as rectal carcinomas. For more information, see Colorectal Cancer.
14. Like peeing immediately after sex to avoid a UTI, it's good to go to the bathroom right after you're done. You'll also probably feel like you have to anyway. You have also opened yourself up to the joy of butt queefs. They're not farts, no matter what anyone says. Unlike frontal queefs, they might go on for a few hours as the air escapes. On the bright side, you are a human beatbox, and your partner can lay a sick freestyle over the top if s/he feels so inclined.

CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the abdomen or chest, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography. For anal cancer, a CT scan of the pelvis and abdomen may be done.
You may need them to treat an infection, but some can kill the “good" bacteria that live in your bowels. You need those to keep your gut in natural balance, so diarrhea can be a common side effect. You also may be more likely to get a yeast infection while taking antibiotics. Ask your doctor if eating yogurt or taking a probiotic supplement may help.
^ Jump up to: a b See here and pages 48–49 for the majority of researchers and heterosexuals defining virginity loss/"technical virginity" by whether or not a person has engaged in vaginal sex. Laura M. Carpenter (2005). Virginity lost: an intimate portrait of first sexual experiences. NYU Press. pp. 295 pages. ISBN 978-0-8147-1652-6. Retrieved October 9, 2011.

Oil Based Lube – Oil based lube feels a little smoother and silkier than water-based lube. It also lasts for ages, so it’s perfect for anal sex, but there are some significant drawbacks. It’s much harder to wash out of linens. More importantly, oil-based lube degrades latex condoms making them tear and rip. Bottom line, if you don’t want the condom to tear during the act, then don’t use an oil-based lube.

^ Randy P. Conner; David Hatfield Sparks; Mariya Sparks (2006) [1997]. Cassell's Encyclopedia of Queer Myth, Symbol, and Spirit: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Lore. Cassell. pp. 20, 216. ISBN 0304337609. Retrieved September 15, 2014. Indeed, homoeroticism in general and anal intercourse in particular are referred to as liwat, while those (primarily men) engaging in these behaviors are referred to as qaum Lut or Luti, 'the people of Lot.'
I’ve had a lot of anal sex before with women who were already experienced and I tried it with my current girlfriend for the first time. She was a bit drunk and on her period and was having a hard time giving me a blow job so she told me to do her wherever I wanted. I asked where she wanted and suggested tits or ass, she said she was down for ass if I wanted it. I told her what I wanted (ass) because it feels so good so she asked where the lube was and I got it.
Your nerve endings are sensitive for a reason. They alert your brain to pain so you can prevent yourself from getting seriously injured, Dr. Chinn says. While numbing creams might make anal penetration feel easier, they don’t make it any easier physically. By numbing your anus, you or your partner could be pushing your body past its point of comfort without even realizing it.
Anal warts (also called condylomas) are growths that form just outside the anus and in the lower anal canal below the dentate line. Sometimes they can be found just above the dentate line. They're caused by infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). People who have or had anal warts are more likely to get anal cancer. (See “Potentially pre-cancerous anal conditions” below and Risk Factors for Anal cancer)
Different types of treatments are available for patients with anal cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Similarly with oral sex, if the person performing the act has any cuts or sores in his or her mouth it makes it easier to transmit or contract an STD since the protective barrier is broken. However, even without cuts or sores, it is still possible to pick up or transmit an STD. Certain infections can specifically affect the mouth, lips, or throat when it is contracted through oral sex, like herpes (HSV-1), chlamydia, and gonorrhea.
Although few cancers are totally preventable, avoiding risk factors and getting regular checkups are important. Using condoms may reduce, but not get rid of the risk of HPV infection. HPV vaccines (for those ages 9 to 26) have been shown to not only lower the risk of HPV infection, but also reduce the risk of anal cancer in men and women. People at increased risk should talk to their physicians about getting an anal cancer screening. During this test, your physician swabs the anal lining, looking at the cells under a microscope for anything unusual. Other forms of screening include looking closely at the area during a surgery, or in the office with a special scope to look in the anal canal. Early identification and treatment of precancerous areas may help prevent anal cancer. 
Many anal cancers are found early because they are in a location that your physician can easily see and reach. Diagnosis is often made when people with any of the above symptoms undergo an anal exam. Anal cancer may also be found incidentally during yearly physical exams that include a digital rectal exam. The rectal exam is performed to check the rectum, prostate or other pelvic organs. Anal cancers can also be found when a person has a preventive colorectal screening test (such as a colonoscopy).
The information presented on The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) website is solely intended to provide you with information that will help educate you on various conditions. No information provided on this website or otherwise offered by ASCRS is intended to replace or in any way modify the advice of your health care professional.
The Gräfenberg spot, or G-spot, is a debated area of female anatomy, particularly among doctors and researchers,[27][36][28] but it is typically described as being located behind the female pubic bone surrounding the urethra and accessible through the anterior wall of the vagina; it and other areas of the vagina are considered to have tissue and nerves that are related to the clitoris.[31][27][28] Direct stimulation of the clitoris, a G-spot area, or both, while engaging in anal sex can help some women enjoy the activity and reach orgasm during it.[2][37]
Because most research on anal intercourse addresses men who have sex with men, little data exists on the prevalence of anal intercourse among heterosexual couples.[6][49] In Kimberly R. McBride's 2010 clinical review on heterosexual anal intercourse and other forms of anal sexual activity, it is suggested that changing norms may affect the frequency of heterosexual anal sex. McBride and her colleagues investigated the prevalence of non-intercourse anal sex behaviors among a sample of men (n=1,299) and women (n=1,919) compared to anal intercourse experience and found that 51% of men and 43% of women had participated in at least one act of oral–anal sex, manual–anal sex, or anal sex toy use.[6] The report states the majority of men (n=631) and women (n=856) who reported heterosexual anal intercourse in the past 12 months were in exclusive, monogamous relationships: 69% and 73%, respectively.[6] The review added that because "relatively little attention [is] given to anal intercourse and other anal sexual behaviors between heterosexual partners", this means that it is "quite rare" to have research "that specifically differentiates the anus as a sexual organ or addresses anal sexual function or dysfunction as legitimate topics. As a result, we do not know the extent to which anal intercourse differs qualitatively from coitus."[6]
The anal sphincter acts as a bit of a gatekeeper for the rectum. For anal sex, however, it’s important that this muscle relaxes. Not only does it make the experience more pleasurable, it reduces the risk of tearing or discomfort. Relaxation involves patience, both at the time you’re attempting penetration, and as you become more accustomed to anal sex.
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