A different kind of sex toy is a vibrator. Vibrators run on electricity or batteries, and they vibrate (buzz) when you turn them on. Many people like the feeling of vibrations on their genitals, especially the clitoris, penis, and anus. Vibrators also come in different shapes, materials, and sizes. Some are shaped so they can be inserted into a vagina or anus. Others are designed to be used on the outside of your body, like on the clitoris or penis. People can get vibrators and other sex toys online, in some drugstores, and at “adult shops” (you may have to be at least 18 years old to go into some stores that sell sex toys).


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Using a new condom is especially important if you’re switching from anal to vaginal penetration so you can avoid moving bacteria from your anus to your vagina or urethra. Your anus is home to all kinds of bacteria your vagina and related parts aren’t used to—namely, gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, like E. coli. When this bacteria reaches your vagina, it can cause vaginal infections, like bacterial vaginosis, which can lead to vaginal itching, burning during urination, a “fishy” vaginal odor, and gray, white, or green vaginal discharge, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can also spread to your urethra, where it can cause a urinary tract infection. According to the Mayo Clinic, this can cause symptoms like constantly needing to pee, then a burning sensation when you do, along with cloudy urine and pelvic pain.
If you’re going ver-r-r-y slowly and using lots of lube, but it’s still not happening, don’t fret. There are plenty of other ways to have fun back there; there’s no need to be too hung up on penetration. But who knows? After a little tongue and finger play, you might just be warmed up enough to try again. You can also try an ‘anal easing’ lubricant, designed to gently relax the anal area for easy insertion, like this one:
Using a new condom is especially important if you’re switching from anal to vaginal penetration so you can avoid moving bacteria from your anus to your vagina or urethra. Your anus is home to all kinds of bacteria your vagina and related parts aren’t used to—namely, gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, like E. coli. When this bacteria reaches your vagina, it can cause vaginal infections, like bacterial vaginosis, which can lead to vaginal itching, burning during urination, a “fishy” vaginal odor, and gray, white, or green vaginal discharge, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can also spread to your urethra, where it can cause a urinary tract infection. According to the Mayo Clinic, this can cause symptoms like constantly needing to pee, then a burning sensation when you do, along with cloudy urine and pelvic pain.
If you’re in a committed relationship and you’ve both tested negative for sexually transmitted diseases, you might want to forgo condoms. But you also might wonder if it’s okay for your man to ejaculate inside you during anal sex. Wonder no longer: doctors say it’s perfectly fine. But again, make sure you’re monogamous and healthy, as it’s easier for the anus to sustain small tears during sex, leaving you more susceptible to infection.
13. You can vary up positions. No, not all butt stuff needs to be done doggie-style. It's true it might be a little harder to get some solid eye contact going on when face-to-anus things are happening. But! There are a variety of positions to try, like lying on your back with your hips elevated or sitting on his face in reverse-cowgirl. Move around until you find one that makes you feel most at ease.
18. “OK. Imagine that you are a kid at school, and you get your school lunch every day. Every day the lunch lady gives you an apple and an orange, and then tells you not to eat the orange. So every day, you eat your apple, and leave your orange sitting on the tray. You love apples. Apples are fucking amazing, you love eating them every day. But every day, for weeks, for months, for years, while you’re eating that apple, there’s an orange right there, inches away, staring you in the face.You’ve never tasted an orange before, and you wonder what it’s like. Is it as good as an apple? Is it different or the same? Around you, you can see that a few other kids are eating their oranges; they seem to be happy about it. You have a friend who’s always going on about how awesome oranges are, how the orange he ate last week was spectacular. And you love your apple; you really do. But after years of that orange staring you right in the face, of watching other people eat their oranges and love them, you just want to eat the fucking orange and see what all the fuss is about.”
7. “It’s tighter around the actual butthole itself then less so deeper in. I’ve tried it with my partner a few times, but have never managed to cum from it because it doesn’t stimulate the more sensitive parts on the end of my penis enough. You might find that you enjoy it less then PiV, but you may also find that the hotness of it does it for you.”
When there’s a bunch of waste in your colon that needs to come out, your colon contracts and pushes the stool into the rectum, an 8-inch chamber that connects the colon to the anus. Your brain receives the signal that you need to head to the bathroom sometime soon, and your rectum stores the stool until you voluntarily contract it to push the poop out.
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In a 2010 clinical review article of heterosexual anal sex, anal intercourse is used to specifically denote penile-anal penetration, and anal sex is used to denote any form of anal sexual activity. The review suggests that anal sex is exotic among the sexual practices of some heterosexuals and that "for a certain number of heterosexuals, anal intercourse is pleasurable, exciting, and perhaps considered more intimate than vaginal sex".[6]

Get ready for amateur anal footage in front of the webcam and hundreds of horny dolls willing to stretch their holes to the max. 18yo pussy virgins who only take it up the ass and picked up hotties doing backdoor sex on the side of the road. And last but not least, ebony beauties shoving white cocks up their booties in the most incredible interracial scenes.


Pain during receptive anal sex among gay men (or men who have sex with men) is formally known as anodyspareunia.[13] In one study, 61% of gay or bisexual men said they experienced painful receptive anal sex and that it was the most frequent sexual difficulty they had experienced. By contrast, 24% of gay or bisexual men stated that they always experienced some degree of pain during anal sex,[13] and about 12% of gay men find it too painful to pursue receptive anal sex; it was concluded that the perception of anal sex as painful is as likely to be psychologically or emotionally based as it is to be physically based.[13][89] Factors predictive of pain during anal sex include inadequate lubrication, feeling tense or anxious, lack of stimulation, as well as lack of social ease with being gay and being closeted. Research has found that psychological factors can in fact be the primary contributors to the experience of pain during anal intercourse and that adequate communication between sexual partners can prevent it, countering the notion that pain is always inevitable during anal sex.[13][89]
Joanna Angel: I go to a proctologist a couple of times a year just to check everything out… It’s kind of important if you’re going to be engaging in anal all the time. My gynecologist recommended I go to one. You’ve got to just listen to your body. You’ve just got to know when you’re too sore and when it’s not the right day for anal. That’s important for any kind of sex, especially for women.
General statistics indicate that 70–80% of women require direct clitoral stimulation to achieve orgasm.[11][25][26] The vaginal walls contain significantly fewer nerve endings than the clitoris (which has many nerve endings specifically intended for orgasm), and therefore intense sexual pleasure, including orgasm, from vaginal sexual stimulation is less likely to occur than from direct clitoral stimulation in the majority of women.[27][28][29] The clitoris is composed of more than the externally visible glans (head).[2][30] The vagina, for example, is flanked on each side by the clitoral crura, the internal legs of the clitoris, which are highly sensitive and become engorged with blood when sexually aroused.[31][32][33] Indirect stimulation of the clitoris through anal penetration may be caused by the shared sensory nerves, especially the pudendal nerve, which gives off the inferior anal nerves and divides into the perineal nerve and the dorsal nerve of the clitoris.[4] Although the anus has many nerve endings, their purpose is not specifically for inducing orgasm, and so a woman achieving orgasm solely by anal stimulation is rare.[34][35]
I really want to enjoy anal sex with my husband, but can’t seem to get over that feeling of needing to go to the bathroom. I’m terrified something may come out while we do it. What’s the best way to get past that “gotta poo” feeling? We want to work up to double penetration, but that’s not going to be possible until I can work through this. BTW – I’m absolutely loving your content. Very helpful!
The most common perception of anal sex is when a male inserts his penis into another person’s anus, which is mostly what this article covers. However, it can also include penetration of the anus with sex toys or fingers or stimulating the anus with the mouth or tongue. It is still considered anal sex if insertion happens, but ejaculation or orgasm does not occur.

There are two ways that we talk about anal intercourse:  receptive anal intercourse and insertive anal intercourse. “Receptive” refers to the person that is receiving penetration, and “insertive” refers to the person (male) who is providing penetration to the anus. There is also heterosexual versus homosexual anal intercourse; here, since we are concerned with pregnancy, we will mainly focus on heterosexual anal intercourse (man with a woman).
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Partaking in any form of sex – be it oral, anal, or vaginal, can put one at risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Anal sex, however, carries the highest risk of transmission. This is because the tissue in the anus is quite fragile and thus incurs small, microscopic tears during the act of anal sex. These tears expose trace amounts of blood, making it much more likely for HIV and/or Hepatitis B or C to be transmitted. The risk of contracting these STIs is greater for the recipient (aka the “bottom”), but the “top” is also at risk. This is still true when lots of lubrication is used.
^ Nathaniel McConaghy (1993). Sexual Behavior: Problems and Management. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 186. ISBN 978-0306441776. Archived from the original on May 6, 2018. Retrieved March 25, 2018. In homosexual relations, most men do not reach orgasm in receptive anal intercourse, and a number report not reaching orgasm by any method in many of their sexual relationships, which they nevertheless enjoy.
When there’s a bunch of waste in your colon that needs to come out, your colon contracts and pushes the stool into the rectum, an 8-inch chamber that connects the colon to the anus. Your brain receives the signal that you need to head to the bathroom sometime soon, and your rectum stores the stool until you voluntarily contract it to push the poop out.
Unless you're fluid-bonded with your partner (meaning that you've both been tested for STIs, have been cleared, and aren't having sex with anyone else), there's risk for contracting STIs with any type of unprotected sex — including anal. "Unprotected anal intercourse is high-risk for many sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea, HIV, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes, HPV, and hepatitis," according to Planned Parenthood. So, please use condoms. Even if you're using a strap-on, it's important to use condoms if the toy has been used with multiple partners.

The most common perception of anal sex is when a male inserts his penis into another person’s anus, which is mostly what this article covers. However, it can also include penetration of the anus with sex toys or fingers or stimulating the anus with the mouth or tongue. It is still considered anal sex if insertion happens, but ejaculation or orgasm does not occur.

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Every body is different and there’s not one “right” way to have an orgasm. You might be able to have an orgasm quickly and easily. Or you might need more time or a very specific type of stimulation. You might be able to have an orgasm when you masturbate but not when you have sex with a partner. All of these differences are normal.  Experimenting with what feels good can help you understand your body and what feels good for you.
So you want to try anal sex. That's great! Anal play can be lots of fun — if you're ready for it. Unlike other types of sex, which most people can fumble their way through when they don't have much experience, anal sex takes some research. (And, to be clear, it's always better to think and talk through any new sexual experience before you try it with a partner).
I am curious if anal sex is okay during pregnancy? I am six months pregnant. My husband and I tried it once before and while it wasn’t painful, I didn’t find it pleasant either. I think if we took it slower and tried your tips I might enjoy it more. I just want to make sure that I am not doing anything I shouldn’t be during my pregnancy, or that pregnancy might somehow effect how it feels.
I’ve had a lot of anal sex before with women who were already experienced and I tried it with my current girlfriend for the first time. She was a bit drunk and on her period and was having a hard time giving me a blow job so she told me to do her wherever I wanted. I asked where she wanted and suggested tits or ass, she said she was down for ass if I wanted it. I told her what I wanted (ass) because it feels so good so she asked where the lube was and I got it.

Nope. Not a great idea. You need to start slowly. The anus is a muscle that needs to be worked up to having larger objects inserted. Start with finger or a small (I do mean v. small) butt plug and either warm yourself up or have a partner help. To do this, lube up your finger or toy and gently massage the anus. As you feel more aroused and comfortable, work the object inside. Gently move it around to loosen up the area.
Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) means taking antiretroviral medicines—medicines used to treat HIV—after being potentially exposed to HIV during sex to prevent becoming infected. PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours after a possible exposure to HIV, but the sooner the better. PEP must be taken once or twice daily for 28 days. When administered correctly, PEP is effective in preventing HIV, but not 100%. To obtain PEP, contact your health care provider, your local or state health department, or go to an emergency room.
I am curious if anal sex is okay during pregnancy? I am six months pregnant. My husband and I tried it once before and while it wasn’t painful, I didn’t find it pleasant either. I think if we took it slower and tried your tips I might enjoy it more. I just want to make sure that I am not doing anything I shouldn’t be during my pregnancy, or that pregnancy might somehow effect how it feels.
3. You might think you're pooping, but you are not. The butt is full of nerves (hence, the point of anal play and foreplay), but that doesn't necessarily mean it can tell whether something is going in or out. You can put an end to things at any time, but just know that the feeling you have is probably just from the ~new stimulation~, not a sudden urge to go.

Women may sexually stimulate a man's anus by fingering the exterior or interior areas of the anus; they may also stimulate the perineum (which, for males, is between the base of the scrotum and the anus), massage the prostate or engage in anilingus.[5][21][65] Sex toys, such as a dildo, may also be used.[5][21] The practice of a woman penetrating a man's anus with a strap-on dildo for sexual activity is called pegging.[20][66]
Anal sex can expose its participants to two principal dangers: infections due to the high number of infectious microorganisms not found elsewhere on the body, and physical damage to the anus and rectum due to their fragility.[14][16] Unprotected penile-anal penetration, colloquially known as barebacking,[73] carries a higher risk of passing on sexually transmitted infections (STIs/STDs) because the anal sphincter is a delicate, easily torn tissue that can provide an entry for pathogens.[14][16] The high concentration of white blood cells around the rectum, together with the risk of tearing and the colon's function to absorb fluid, are what place those who engage in anal sex at high risk of STIs.[16] Use of condoms, ample lubrication to reduce the risk of tearing,[2][41] and safer sex practices in general, reduce the risk of STI transmission.[16][74] However, a condom can break or otherwise come off during anal sex, and this is more likely to happen with anal sex than with other sex acts because of the tightness of the anal sphincters during friction.[16]
So when you have vaginal sex, and the man cums then (most of the time) pulls out. What happens then? (not sure how graphic I can be here…) Some of the semen comes back out and gets on the sheets, your panties, down your leg… you get the picture. Ever noticed that if stay still on your back or it comes out pretty quickly, that it runs down you to the bed… passing near / over / maybe even slightly in the anus.
Anal sex can expose its participants to two principal dangers: infections due to the high number of infectious microorganisms not found elsewhere on the body, and physical damage to the anus and rectum due to their fragility.[14][16] Unprotected penile-anal penetration, colloquially known as barebacking,[73] carries a higher risk of passing on sexually transmitted infections (STIs/STDs) because the anal sphincter is a delicate, easily torn tissue that can provide an entry for pathogens.[14][16] The high concentration of white blood cells around the rectum, together with the risk of tearing and the colon's function to absorb fluid, are what place those who engage in anal sex at high risk of STIs.[16] Use of condoms, ample lubrication to reduce the risk of tearing,[2][41] and safer sex practices in general, reduce the risk of STI transmission.[16][74] However, a condom can break or otherwise come off during anal sex, and this is more likely to happen with anal sex than with other sex acts because of the tightness of the anal sphincters during friction.[16]
General statistics indicate that 70–80% of women require direct clitoral stimulation to achieve orgasm.[11][25][26] The vaginal walls contain significantly fewer nerve endings than the clitoris (which has many nerve endings specifically intended for orgasm), and therefore intense sexual pleasure, including orgasm, from vaginal sexual stimulation is less likely to occur than from direct clitoral stimulation in the majority of women.[27][28][29] The clitoris is composed of more than the externally visible glans (head).[2][30] The vagina, for example, is flanked on each side by the clitoral crura, the internal legs of the clitoris, which are highly sensitive and become engorged with blood when sexually aroused.[31][32][33] Indirect stimulation of the clitoris through anal penetration may be caused by the shared sensory nerves, especially the pudendal nerve, which gives off the inferior anal nerves and divides into the perineal nerve and the dorsal nerve of the clitoris.[4] Although the anus has many nerve endings, their purpose is not specifically for inducing orgasm, and so a woman achieving orgasm solely by anal stimulation is rare.[34][35]
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