18. “OK. Imagine that you are a kid at school, and you get your school lunch every day. Every day the lunch lady gives you an apple and an orange, and then tells you not to eat the orange. So every day, you eat your apple, and leave your orange sitting on the tray. You love apples. Apples are fucking amazing, you love eating them every day. But every day, for weeks, for months, for years, while you’re eating that apple, there’s an orange right there, inches away, staring you in the face.You’ve never tasted an orange before, and you wonder what it’s like. Is it as good as an apple? Is it different or the same? Around you, you can see that a few other kids are eating their oranges; they seem to be happy about it. You have a friend who’s always going on about how awesome oranges are, how the orange he ate last week was spectacular. And you love your apple; you really do. But after years of that orange staring you right in the face, of watching other people eat their oranges and love them, you just want to eat the fucking orange and see what all the fuss is about.”
Then, when you feel cool, calm, and ready to start exploring anal play, you or your partner can use a finger or sex toy to massage the outside of your anus. This can help you get familiar with the sensation before any kind of penetration happens. Once you’re beginning to enjoy yourself, Dr. Chinn says you can experiment with sticking a finger or sex toy in your anus bit by bit based on what feels good, using plenty of lube, of course.
Using a new condom is especially important if you’re switching from anal to vaginal penetration so you can avoid moving bacteria from your anus to your vagina or urethra. Your anus is home to all kinds of bacteria your vagina and related parts aren’t used to—namely, gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, like E. coli. When this bacteria reaches your vagina, it can cause vaginal infections, like bacterial vaginosis, which can lead to vaginal itching, burning during urination, a “fishy” vaginal odor, and gray, white, or green vaginal discharge, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can also spread to your urethra, where it can cause a urinary tract infection. According to the Mayo Clinic, this can cause symptoms like constantly needing to pee, then a burning sensation when you do, along with cloudy urine and pelvic pain.
Every body is different and there’s not one “right” way to have an orgasm. You might be able to have an orgasm quickly and easily. Or you might need more time or a very specific type of stimulation. You might be able to have an orgasm when you masturbate but not when you have sex with a partner. All of these differences are normal.  Experimenting with what feels good can help you understand your body and what feels good for you.
The information presented on The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) website is solely intended to provide you with information that will help educate you on various conditions. No information provided on this website or otherwise offered by ASCRS is intended to replace or in any way modify the advice of your health care professional.
These cancers start in cells in the skin or anal lining that make the brown pigment called melanin. Only a very small portion of anal cancers are melanomas. Melanomas are far more common on the skin in other parts of the body. If melanomas are found at an early stage (before they have grown deeply into the skin or spread to lymph nodes) they can be removed with surgery, and the outlook for long-term survival is very good. But because anal melanomas are hard to see, most are found at a later stage. If possible, the entire tumor is removed with surgery. If all of the tumor can be removed, a cure is possible. If the melanoma has spread too far to be removed completely, other treatments may be given. For more on this, see Melanoma Skin Cancer.

Unless you're fluid-bonded with your partner (meaning that you've both been tested for STIs, have been cleared, and aren't having sex with anyone else), there's risk for contracting STIs with any type of unprotected sex — including anal. "Unprotected anal intercourse is high-risk for many sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea, HIV, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes, HPV, and hepatitis," according to Planned Parenthood. So, please use condoms. Even if you're using a strap-on, it's important to use condoms if the toy has been used with multiple partners.
Then, when you feel cool, calm, and ready to start exploring anal play, you or your partner can use a finger or sex toy to massage the outside of your anus. This can help you get familiar with the sensation before any kind of penetration happens. Once you’re beginning to enjoy yourself, Dr. Chinn says you can experiment with sticking a finger or sex toy in your anus bit by bit based on what feels good, using plenty of lube, of course.
“Awkwardness doesn’t mean you’re not close with your partner or in a healthy relationship, it’s because we’re taught from a young age that sex is a taboo topic,” Levkoff says. “Bringing up to a partner a potential thing that you want to try is going to be uncomfortable regardless of what it is. I think that we forget that a part of sexual intimacy means being vulnerable and being able to have those conversations. That’s a human thing. It’s part of being sexually mature.”
"I was always afraid it would hurt, but anal sex actually isn’t so much painful as it is uncomfortable. But! The discomfort is so extreme for some people that they can barely do it—like my best friend, who’s tried a few times with her fiancé and barely gotten it in, no matter how much lube they use. The key, apparently, is to be relaxed, which you really aren’t gonna be—in fact, knowing it’s about to happen will make you tense up more than usual—unless you happen to love it.
© 2019 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 5/25/18) and Your California Privacy Rights. Teen Vogue may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices
3. You might think you're pooping, but you are not. The butt is full of nerves (hence, the point of anal play and foreplay), but that doesn't necessarily mean it can tell whether something is going in or out. You can put an end to things at any time, but just know that the feeling you have is probably just from the ~new stimulation~, not a sudden urge to go.

Although few cancers are totally preventable, avoiding risk factors and getting regular checkups are important. Using condoms may reduce, but not get rid of the risk of HPV infection. HPV vaccines (for those ages 9 to 26) have been shown to not only lower the risk of HPV infection, but also reduce the risk of anal cancer in men and women. People at increased risk should talk to their physicians about getting an anal cancer screening. During this test, your physician swabs the anal lining, looking at the cells under a microscope for anything unusual. Other forms of screening include looking closely at the area during a surgery, or in the office with a special scope to look in the anal canal. Early identification and treatment of precancerous areas may help prevent anal cancer. 
^ Jump up to: a b c Kilchevsky A, Vardi Y, Lowenstein L, Gruenwald I (January 2012). "Is the Female G-Spot Truly a Distinct Anatomic Entity?". The Journal of Sexual Medicine. 9 (3): 719–26. doi:10.1111/j.1743-6109.2011.02623.x. PMID 22240236. Lay summary – G-Spot Does Not Exist, 'Without A Doubt,' Say Researchers - The Huffington Post (19 January 2012).

Anal cancer forms when a genetic mutation turns normal, healthy cells into abnormal cells. Healthy cells grow and multiply at a set rate, eventually dying at a set time. Abnormal cells grow and multiply out of control, and they don't die. The accumulating abnormal cells form a mass (tumor). Cancer cells invade nearby tissues and can separate from an initial tumor to spread elsewhere in the body (metastasize).
People who are HIV-negative and at very high risk for HIV can take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), if taken consistently, can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Since PrEP is not 100% effective at preventing HIV, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk. Only condoms can help protect against other STDs.
1. Relax those booty muscles. There are a bunch of li'l muscles around your anus that can be pretty tight if you're not relaxed. And as logic follows, if those muscles and your anal sphincter are tight, inserting anything can be painful and difficult rather than pleasurable and easy. Try something like deep breathing or a relaxing massage with your partner to make sure both you and your bum muscles are sufficiently chilled out, pre-anal play.
A different kind of sex toy is a vibrator. Vibrators run on electricity or batteries, and they vibrate (buzz) when you turn them on. Many people like the feeling of vibrations on their genitals, especially the clitoris, penis, and anus. Vibrators also come in different shapes, materials, and sizes. Some are shaped so they can be inserted into a vagina or anus. Others are designed to be used on the outside of your body, like on the clitoris or penis. People can get vibrators and other sex toys online, in some drugstores, and at “adult shops” (you may have to be at least 18 years old to go into some stores that sell sex toys).
See pros in crystal-clear video bent over, with legs high in the air or even riding away butt-first! Want to introduce anal sex into your own love life? Show your girl how easily these XXX starlets can take a dick where the sun don’t shine! Will she feel a competitive edge coming on and finally let you plunge your sausage deep between her buns? There’s only one way to find out and now you can both sit back and enjoy seamless HD playback together and explore new sensations.
Glickman recommends starting with your face looking down at the bed and getting on your elbows and knees, rather than hands and knees, because you want your hips higher than your shoulders, so the penetrator has easier access. He also recommends trying the position where the receiver is standing and bent over the bed, or doing cowgirl/cowboy with the receiver straddling so that they can control the depth and pace.
Images in this summary are used with permission of the author(s), artist, and/or publisher for use in the PDQ summaries only. If you want to use an image from a PDQ summary and you are not using the whole summary, you must get permission from the owner. It cannot be given by the National Cancer Institute. Information about using the images in this summary, along with many other images related to cancer can be found in Visuals Online. Visuals Online is a collection of more than 3,000 scientific images.
Relaxation is key and also making sure you're lubed up. "Like first timers, I mean really wet and slippery trust me sometimes that's the number one problem! The best sex position I've ever felt it in was laying on my stomach and he sneaked it in between my cheeks, laid down on top of me and rubbed my clit with one hand while supporting himself with the other, and whispering dirty things in my ear while nibbling on it," says Jillian Janson, an award-winning adult star.
Receptive anal sex is much riskier for getting HIV. The bottom partner is 13 times more likely to get infected than the top. However, it’s possible for either partner to get HIV through anal sex from certain body fluids—blood, semen (cum), pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum), or rectal fluids—of a person who has HIV. Using condoms or medicines to protect against transmission can decrease this risk.
The term buggery originated in medieval Europe as an insult used to describe the rumored same-sex sexual practices of the heretics from a sect originating in Bulgaria, where its followers were called bogomils;[123] when they spread out of the country, they were called buggres (from the ethnonym Bulgars).[123] Another term for the practice, more archaic, is pedicate from the Latin pedicare, with the same meaning.[124]
Spreading STIs. Infections and diseases that are shared during sexual intercourse — such as HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and herpes — can be shared through anal sex. In fact, anal sex is the sexual behavior for transmitting and getting HIV for both men and women. People on the receiving end (or “the bottom”) of anal sex are more likely to become infected with HIV than the inserting partner (or “the top”).
×