In addition to nerve endings, pleasure from anal intercourse may be aided by the close proximity between the anus and the prostate for males, and vagina, clitoral legs and anal area for females. This is because of indirect stimulation of the prostate and vagina or clitoral legs.[7][8][9] For a male insertive partner, the tightness of the anus can be a source of pleasure via the tactile pressure on the penis.[10][11] Pleasure from the anus can also be achieved through anal masturbation, fingering,[3] facesitting, anilingus, and other penetrative and non-penetrative acts. Anal stretching or fisting is pleasurable for some, but it poses a more serious threat of damage due to the deliberate stretching of the anal and rectal tissues; its injuries include anal sphincter lacerations and rectal and sigmoid colon (rectosigmoid) perforation, which might result in death.[12] Lubricant and condoms are widely regarded as a necessity while performing anal sex as well as a slow and cautious penetration.[13]
Chlamydia and erectile dysfunction: What's the link? Some people who have chlamydia also experience erectile dysfunction (ED), which involves problems getting or maintaining an erection. Chlamydia can infect the prostate gland, leading to prostatitis, pain, and ED. In this article, learn more about the link between this common infection and ED, and treatments for both. Read now
First, a few words about the survey. We shared this 15-question anonymous survey with our social media followers, on our website and in our newsletters—to reach a convenience sample of people connected to San Francisco AIDS Foundation. The 412 people who took the survey likely felt they had something to say about pain and sex. (In other words, the sample isn’t representative of our entire community or San Francisco.)
People who are HIV-negative and at very high risk for HIV can take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), if taken consistently, can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Since PrEP is not 100% effective at preventing HIV, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk. Only condoms can help protect against other STDs.
According to a 2010 study from the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB) that was authored by Debby Herbenick et al., although anal intercourse is reported by fewer women than other partnered sex behaviors, partnered women in the age groups between 18–49 are significantly more likely to report having anal sex in the past 90 days. Women engaged in anal intercourse less commonly than men. Vaginal intercourse was practiced more than insertive anal intercourse among men, but 13% to 15% of men aged 25 to 49 practiced insertive anal intercourse.[50][51]

1. Relax those booty muscles. There are a bunch of li'l muscles around your anus that can be pretty tight if you're not relaxed. And as logic follows, if those muscles and your anal sphincter are tight, inserting anything can be painful and difficult rather than pleasurable and easy. Try something like deep breathing or a relaxing massage with your partner to make sure both you and your bum muscles are sufficiently chilled out, pre-anal play.
“Awkwardness doesn’t mean you’re not close with your partner or in a healthy relationship, it’s because we’re taught from a young age that sex is a taboo topic,” Levkoff says. “Bringing up to a partner a potential thing that you want to try is going to be uncomfortable regardless of what it is. I think that we forget that a part of sexual intimacy means being vulnerable and being able to have those conversations. That’s a human thing. It’s part of being sexually mature.”
Many anal cancers are found early because they are in a location that your physician can easily see and reach. Diagnosis is often made when people with any of the above symptoms undergo an anal exam. Anal cancer may also be found incidentally during yearly physical exams that include a digital rectal exam. The rectal exam is performed to check the rectum, prostate or other pelvic organs. Anal cancers can also be found when a person has a preventive colorectal screening test (such as a colonoscopy).
Kimmie KaBoom: I also am against people using poppers or pills to relax muscles for the same reasons. [And] remember to practice safe sex, because STDs can still be transmitted anally, too. [Note: The fragility of anal wall tissue makes micro tears more likely, increasing the risk of sexually transmitted disease transmission significantly versus vaginal sex.]

You might also want to manage expectations with your partner upfront. "You can say, 'Look, I want to try this with you, but if I don’t like it then I want us to be okay with this being a one-time thing,'" Levkoff says. "It's important to own that up front. If someone says, 'Well if I really like it then I’m going to want to do it more,' then that’s an obvious sign this may not be a relationship you want to be in."
You might also want to manage expectations with your partner upfront. "You can say, 'Look, I want to try this with you, but if I don’t like it then I want us to be okay with this being a one-time thing,'" Levkoff says. "It's important to own that up front. If someone says, 'Well if I really like it then I’m going to want to do it more,' then that’s an obvious sign this may not be a relationship you want to be in."
Although people tend to think that having an orgasm is the goal of sex, you can get lots of pleasure from doing sexual things even if you don’t have an orgasm. In fact, putting a lot of pressure on having an orgasm can make you or your partner anxious, which can make sex stressful and less enjoyable. Relax, and remember that pleasure, not orgasms, is the goal.
Nope. Not a great idea. You need to start slowly. The anus is a muscle that needs to be worked up to having larger objects inserted. Start with finger or a small (I do mean v. small) butt plug and either warm yourself up or have a partner help. To do this, lube up your finger or toy and gently massage the anus. As you feel more aroused and comfortable, work the object inside. Gently move it around to loosen up the area.

Men who have sex with men may also prefer to engage in frot or other forms of mutual masturbation because they find it more pleasurable or more affectionate, to preserve technical virginity, or as safe sex alternatives to anal sex,[53][55][61] while other frot advocates denounce anal sex as degrading to the receptive partner and unnecessarily risky.[58][62]
How long do hemorrhoids last? What to know Hemorrhoids are a common problem, particularly during pregnancy and as people age. While hemorrhoids sometimes only last for a few days and cause mild symptoms, some people experience frequent or long-lasting hemorrhoids. Here, learn more about how long hemorrhoids last. We also cover treatment and home remedies. Read now
Anal sex being more common among heterosexuals today than it was previously has been linked to the increase in consumption of anal pornography among men, especially among those who view it on a regular basis.[39][40][52] Seidman et al. argued that "cheap, accessible and, especially, interactive media have enabled many more people to produce as well as consume pornography", and that this modern way of producing pornography, in addition to the buttocks and anus having become more eroticized, has led to a significant interest in or obsession with anal sex among men.[52]
That information is very necessary, but I refuse to end this on a kind of scary note. The truth is that you can have an excellent time with anal play. Or it could be the exact opposite of your thing, which is OK, too. Either way, if you keep the above information in mind, you’re way more likely to come out of the experience having explored anal sex in a safe, healthy, potentially mind-blowing way.
So definitely don't shame yourself, your partners, or other people for wanting to try anal or enjoying it. "There’s actually very little fecal matter in that area of the rectum and the cleanup is similar to vaginal sex," she says. "The problem is a lot of people have bad experiences when they've tried anal play, because they don't know what they're doing, so that turns them off from it. Lots of people will be surprised at how much they enjoy it if they just did it right."

A fungus, like the one that causes most vaginal yeast infections, can also cause anal itching. And certain kinds of bacteria can, too. For example, a staph skin infection can happen almost anywhere, including the area around your anus. And the same kind of bacteria that causes strep throat can trigger a red, itchy rash around the anus. This is more common in kids than adults.
It can be scary when you're trying something new, especially when it involves a body part you're not use to anyone touching. But try to relax as much as possible, because it will make anal sex better, Pitagora says. "Anoreceptive sex is enhanced by an openness to the experience, trust of the insertive partner, an associated sense of arousal, and the ability to overcome the stereotypical taboo," they once wrote in a paper. Bottom line, do whatever it takes to feel as comfortable as possible, because when you're relaxed you'll enjoy the experience more.
3. Once you are both used to it, I find that often her lubrication coming out from vaginal sex and all over my penis when I pull out is all I need for anal penetration. (Tried the first time after 5-6 regular anal encounters.) Just warn her before you switch, or make sure you know her body enough before you try this without a warning. Depending on gravity and how excited she stays, I often find that she stays almost as wet in the back as the front… but she REALLY likes it as she can have multiples “back to back” in either entrance!!! Before we met, she was 35, she had tried anal once and hated it, and had only had 6 orgasms total during intercourse in her life, now she has 6 in a row or more just during the anal part of things.

If you’re positive you have a G-spot and are excited about the prospect of orgasming from anal, it really depends on whether yours is sensitive enough to feel anal penetration. Don’t worry if this isn’t the case for you, because it’s typically not easy for anal to stimulate this area, Dr. Chinn says. With that said, if clitoral stimulation helps you orgasm, you or your partner can add that to the mix during anal to help you get there.


The anus lacks the natural lubrication the vagina has. Penetration can tear the tissue inside the anus, allowing bacteria and viruses to enter the bloodstream. This can result in the spread of sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Studies have suggested that anal exposure to HIV poses 30 times more risk for the receptive partner than vaginal exposure. Exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV) may also lead to the development of anal warts and anal cancer. Using lubricants can help some, but doesn't completely prevent tearing.
If you're playing with silicone-based toys and need a water-based lube, Sliquid Sassy is a great option that's specifically intended for anal play. It's got a thicker texture than many water-based lubes as a result — almost gel-like — to offer you all the lubrication you need. As with all water-based lubes, it'll dry out faster than silicone, but a little bit of water splashed on the right area will "re-activate" it if you need a boost when it comes to the slippery factor.
6. “I’m probably an outlier on the spectrum of “tightness” that I enjoy, in that I actually don’t enjoy a tight pussy. I don’t jerk off with a tight squeeze – very, very light in fact with a LOT of lube. That being said, the best blow job for me is the kind where the woman’s mouth is loosely mocking a wet, slimy cave that you park a Prius in. I just want to feel the sliding and wetness. When it comes to pussy, I love it, but my favorite is pounding my GF with a large dildo (which she loves) and being the last to be inside of her, after she’s all loosened up. You know that old saying, ‘It’s like throwing a hotdog down a hallway’? I actually prefer that. I’m not sure why, psychologically, but it just feels great to me to be flopping around in there. So, when it comes to anal, all of those descriptions are exactly what its like. It’s open. It’s wet (with a lot of lube, of course), it’s slimy, and it’s unconstricted.”
Latex or polyurethane male condoms are highly effective in preventing HIV and certain other STDs when used correctly from start to finish for each act of anal sex. People who report using condoms consistently reduced their risk of getting HIV through insertive anal sex with an HIV-positive partner, on average, by 63%, and receptive anal sex with an HIV-positive partner, on average, by 72%. Condoms are much less effective when not used consistently. It is also important that sufficient water- or silicone-based lubricant be used during anal sex to prevent condom breakage and tearing of tissue. Female nitrile condoms can also prevent HIV and some other STDs. Since condoms are not 100% effective, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk.
Reduce your risk of cutting or scratching your partner by trimming your nails. Long nails might tear the thin, delicate tissue of the anus, which could lead to bleeding. It also increases the risk of spreading bacteria that could cause infections. Be sure to wash your hands well and scrub under your nails after anal sex, too, especially before inserting them into the vagina or mouth.
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