Yes, cancer! Certain strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) can cause dysplasia, or atypical changes to cells. Those abnormal cells can over time become cancer. The medical community has routine screening guidelines in place for women to get yearly gynecological exams and regular pap smears to screen for pre-cancerous changes on the cervix. These standards of care help doctors catch these changes and treat them before cancer can develop on the cervix. Even dentists are now doing routine checks of the back of the throat and tonsils to screen for cancers caused by HPV transmitted through oral sex.
Inadequately cleaned toys can serve as a reservoir for bacterial growth and even some viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a condom with toys – even if you don’t share your toys – will reduce the risk of infections. Hepatitis C, furthermore, can survive as a miniscule drop of dried blood on a toy (or other object) for up to 3 months and become reactivated when wet. (If your eyes aren’t bulging, go back and re-read that last sentence.) (Side note: that’s why sharing cocaine straws is a very real method of Hep C transmission: cocaine causes micro-tears in the nose, leaving invisible specs of blood on the straw that harbor the virus for up to 3 months.) So instead of scrubbing your toys with a nail brush or boiling them compulsively, just use a condom and rinse them off in warm, soapy water afterwards.
8. Try it on your own first. You know how it's basically impossible to tickle yourself? This isn't the same, but trying out anal foreplay on your own is informed by a similar mind-set. You won't be surprised as much by your own, um, touch. It won't be the same as it would be coming from a partner, but it's a good way to feel out if you're into the sensation.
How long do hemorrhoids last? What to know Hemorrhoids are a common problem, particularly during pregnancy and as people age. While hemorrhoids sometimes only last for a few days and cause mild symptoms, some people experience frequent or long-lasting hemorrhoids. Here, learn more about how long hemorrhoids last. We also cover treatment and home remedies. Read now
6. Throw other stimulation into the mix. Listen, they don't make those wild-looking, three-pronged sex toys for nothing. Once you're in the groove of things, add in some clit stimulation, some vaginal stimulation, or heck, all three. Some women say this combo feels overstimulating in the best way. In any case, most women need some combination of stimulation to orgasm—whether that's clit/vaginal, or anal/clit+vaginal is totally subjective. But isn't it fun to learn new things about your own orgasms?

Please explain the risk if you follow ALL safety measures (off the top of my head here are just a few of them to consider): Condom, lots of lube to help prevent condom breakage (and most women I know don’t like dry anal), go slow until things are “ready”, used a toy to stretch things a little bit first, both partners got tested, did your best not to “contaminate” the vagina, were on birth control (in case the condom broke & it was that time of the month & the sperm spread to the vagina), immediately cleaned up, both washed hands immediately and took showers immediately afterwards, cleaned the sheets properly, etc… So if you do all of that, what “very risky” issues are we talking about???

Anal sex has been more accepted in modern times; it is often considered a natural, pleasurable form of sexual expression.[5][7][97] Some people, men in particular, are only interested in anal sex for sexual satisfaction, which has been partly attributed to the buttocks and anus being more eroticized in modern culture, including via pornography.[52] Engaging in anal sex is still, however, punished in some societies.[7][99] For example, regarding LGBT rights in Iran, Iran's Penal Code states in Article 109 that "both men involved in same-sex penetrative (anal) or non-penetrative sex will be punished" and "Article 110 states that those convicted of engaging in anal sex will be executed and that the manner of execution is at the discretion of the judge".[99]
Some Love It, Some Don’t – Some women really adore anal sex. They find it incredibly pleasurable, while others don’t find it pleasurable at all. It comes down to personal preference, so if you try it and don’t enjoy it, that’s fine. There’s no need to stress about it if you don’t get much stimulation from it. Instead, try something else from the Bad Girls Bible.
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Contrary to popular belief, guys aren’t the only ones who are ass-obsessed. Look, like we said before: there are a lot of nerve endings back there. It feels good; that’s just biology. Sure, your anus is tighter than your vagina, which is going to blow your man’s mind. But anal sex is also an extremely intimate act that can actually bring you and your partner closer together. You’re not going to let just anyone go there, and he knows it. That’s hot.
If you’ve had unprotected anal sex and are worried about possible HIV infection, go and see your healthcare professional straight away. You may be able to take post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent HIV infection, but it has to be taken within 72 hours to be effective. However, PEP is not a replacement for condoms and isn’t available everywhere.  
PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
Using a new condom is especially important if you’re switching from anal to vaginal penetration so you can avoid moving bacteria from your anus to your vagina or urethra. Your anus is home to all kinds of bacteria your vagina and related parts aren’t used to—namely, gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, like E. coli. When this bacteria reaches your vagina, it can cause vaginal infections, like bacterial vaginosis, which can lead to vaginal itching, burning during urination, a “fishy” vaginal odor, and gray, white, or green vaginal discharge, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can also spread to your urethra, where it can cause a urinary tract infection. According to the Mayo Clinic, this can cause symptoms like constantly needing to pee, then a burning sensation when you do, along with cloudy urine and pelvic pain.
The information presented on The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) website is solely intended to provide you with information that will help educate you on various conditions. No information provided on this website or otherwise offered by ASCRS is intended to replace or in any way modify the advice of your health care professional.
So depending on the amount of semen, umm.. how “open” it is either from earlier sex or just being able to very easily take almost any man (was that a politically correct way to say that? lol), how you wipe (STILL FRONT TO BACK), or if you get dressed quick and it all spills into your panties and then your “lady parts” are rubbing all in it as you move and walk. It is possible for enough semen to get in the vagina to result in pregnancy.
The abundance of nerve endings in the anal region and rectum can make anal sex pleasurable for men or women.[4][2][5] The internal and external sphincter muscles control the opening and closing of the anus; these muscles, which are sensitive membranes made up of many nerve endings, facilitate pleasure or pain during anal sex.[2][5] The Human Sexuality: An Encyclopedia states that "the inner third of the anal canal is less sensitive to touch than the outer two-thirds, but is more sensitive to pressure" and that "the rectum is a curved tube about eight or nine inches long and has the capacity, like the anus, to expand".[5]
The most common formulation of Buddhist ethics is the Five Precepts. These precepts take the form of voluntary, personal undertakings, not divine mandate or instruction. The third of the Precepts is "To refrain from committing sexual misconduct".[136] However, "sexual misconduct" (Sanskrit: Kāmesu micchācāra, literally "sense gratifications arising from the 5 senses") is subject to interpretation relative to the social norms of the followers.[137] Buddhism, in its fundamental form, does not define what is right and what is wrong in absolute terms for lay followers. Therefore, the interpretation of what kinds of sexual activity are acceptable for a layman is not a religious matter as far as Buddhism is concerned.[138]
That is a shame, because not only can anal sex be done safely, with no or minimal risk of injury, but it can, in theory, be fun for everyone. The opening of the anus contains tons of nerve endings in people of any gender; it is also close to the "legs" of the clitoris and the vaginal g-spot, and allows stimulation of the prostate, for those who have that anatomy. “I’ve found that I love anal orgasms and get really turned on by gaping,” says Snow. “An anal orgasm is intense for males, making their whole body quiver, or in some cases causing a man or trans woman to ejaculate without ever touching themselves,” says prominent trans porn star Kimber Haven.
Yes, you can still contract or transmit STDs through anal and oral sex. Anal sex can more easily damage tissue (tears in the lining of the anus or rectum) than during vaginal sex because the anus is not designed for insertion. Therefore, the skin barrier that often protects against infection is broken and STDs can more easily enter the body. This means that transmitting or contracting an STD is more likely from anal sex than with vaginal or oral sex.
"Another thing I have heard from many women is that from the anatomical point of view there simply can be no pleasure out of anal sex for women," says Singer. Seriously. "'There's nothing up there that can actually make it feel good.' Although this simply isn't true (there are actually more nerve bundles in the rectum than in the vaginal cavity), a great number of women rely on this as one of their reasons for not wanting to engage in anal sex."

But you can't just slide into anal sex (unless you're using plenty of lube...but more on that later). If you don't know what you're doing and you aren't careful, you could hurt yourself or your partner because the anus is sensitive. "Contrary to what many believe, anal sex does not have to be painful (unless people engaging in it want it to be)," says Dulcinea Pitagora, a sex therapist known as the Kink Doctor. So before you give anal a try, read our tips about how to prep, both physically and mentally.
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
Anal sex or anal intercourse is generally the insertion and thrusting of the erect penis into a person's anus, or anus and rectum, for sexual pleasure.[1][2][3] Other forms of anal sex include fingering, the use of sex toys for anal penetration, oral sex performed on the anus (anilingus), and pegging.[4][5] Although anal sex most commonly means penile–anal penetration,[3][4][6] sources sometimes use anal intercourse to exclusively denote penile–anal penetration, and anal sex to denote any form of anal sexual activity, especially between pairings as opposed to anal masturbation.[6][7]

PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
The anus is the end of the large intestine, below the rectum, through which stool (solid waste) leaves the body. The anus is formed partly from the outer skin layers of the body and partly from the intestine. Two ring-like muscles, called sphincter muscles, open and close the anal opening and let stool pass out of the body. The anal canal, the part of the anus between the rectum and the anal opening, is about 1-1½ inches long.
One of the biggest trepidations people have about trying anal sex is that "that's where the poop comes from." But that's actually not 100% true, Pitagora says. "Concerns about dirtiness or messiness are not as relevant as you might think because feces are not stored where anal sex happens (near the anus and rectum), but in the upper bowels," they say.
But porn anal, most in the adult industry will gladly tell you, is a fantasy. “Girls train their assholes in order to take the kind of crazy poundings they take on film,” says Skylar Snow, an adult performer who entered the industry last year. That training and prep is different for everyone, but usually it involves acclimating anuses with fingers or toys for hours or days before a scene, and using relaxation tricks. Some take supplements to keep their BMs regular, fasting, popping Imodium, and doing at least one enema in the half-day or day before a scene to minimize the risk of a fecal mishap. “The controlled environment of porn really does help,” says Joseline Kelly, who entered the industry in 2015. "Because, OK, I know I’m going to have anal with this person over here and at this time, so you just feel 100 percent ready” in a way you often can’t in real life.
Latex or polyurethane male condoms are highly effective in preventing HIV and certain other STDs when used correctly from start to finish for each act of anal sex. People who report using condoms consistently reduced their risk of getting HIV through insertive anal sex with an HIV-positive partner, on average, by 63%, and receptive anal sex with an HIV-positive partner, on average, by 72%. Condoms are much less effective when not used consistently. It is also important that sufficient water- or silicone-based lubricant be used during anal sex to prevent condom breakage and tearing of tissue. Female nitrile condoms can also prevent HIV and some other STDs. Since condoms are not 100% effective, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk.
One person described it as “like getting a tattoo: It hurts, but you know you still love it.” Another person compared it to popping a painful pimple: “The first few seconds can sting, but the sense of relief and endorphins rush immediately afterwards floods out the momentary ‘pain.’” A few other people compared it to the pain you experience when working out. “It hurts because it’s a muscle being stretched. When you first work out, your muscles hurt because they’re being stretched, but you feel good. Similar good feeling but exponentially better.”
For some women out there, anal sex is the cherry on top of a sexual sundae: a little extra treat that elevates something that was already delicious on its own (duh, talking about sex here). But for others, it's more like pâté: intriguing enough, worth a try, but absolutely not up their alleys (as in, a penis will probably not be going up that alley ever again).
In a male receptive partner, being anally penetrated can produce a pleasurable sensation due to the inserted penis rubbing or brushing against the prostate through the anal wall.[4][11] This can result in pleasurable sensations and can lead to an orgasm in some cases.[4][11] Prostate stimulation can produce a deeper orgasm, sometimes described by men as more widespread and intense, longer-lasting, and allowing for greater feelings of ecstasy than orgasm elicited by penile stimulation only.[4][11] The prostate is located next to the rectum and is the larger, more developed male homologue (variation) to the female Skene's glands.[22] It is also typical for a man to not reach orgasm as a receptive partner solely from anal sex.[23][24]
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