1. Don't try it if you don't want to. There's a big difference between "I don't necessarily fantasize about getting a penis enema but I want to blow my partner's mind" and "I would rather die than do this but I guess I can suffer through it because he's been pressuring me." If you're in a mutually caring, healthy relationship (with a guy who goes down on you for half an hour, minimum), maybe you'll want to do it for your partner or you won't. Either way is 100 percent fine, and if he keeps pressuring you when you have made it clear that it is not on the table, tell him to suck it.


b : of, relating to, characterized by, or being personality traits (such as parsimony, meticulousness, and ill humor) considered typical of fixation at the anal stage of development : anal-retentive an anal disposition —often used in nontechnical contexts to describe someone as extremely or excessively neat, careful, or precise I have a mania for neatness in some matters that is almost anal.— Joseph Heller


"People assume that those who try anal sex have to be gay, or that only men like to have anal, or that having anal is weird, shameful, and wrong because the butt is supposed to only be an 'exit,'" Van Kirk tells BuzzFeed Health. "But that's not true at all. Anyone can experiment with and enjoy anal. In fact, anal sex is the primary form of sex in some countries where birth control is not available to them."
Unprotected receptive anal sex (with an HIV positive partner) is the sex act most likely to result in HIV transmission.[14][15][16] Other infections that can be transmitted by unprotected anal sex are human papillomavirus (HPV) (which can increase risk of anal cancer[75]); typhoid fever;[76] amoebiasis; chlamydia;[15] cryptosporidiosis; E. coli infections; giardiasis; gonorrhea;[15] hepatitis A; hepatitis B; hepatitis C; herpes simplex;[15] Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8);[77] lymphogranuloma venereum; Mycoplasma hominis; Mycoplasma genitalium; pubic lice;[15] salmonellosis; shigella; syphilis;[15] tuberculosis; and Ureaplasma urealyticum.[78]
The anus lacks the natural lubrication the vagina has. Penetration can tear the tissue inside the anus, allowing bacteria and viruses to enter the bloodstream. This can result in the spread of sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Studies have suggested that anal exposure to HIV poses 30 times more risk for the receptive partner than vaginal exposure. Exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV) may also lead to the development of anal warts and anal cancer. Using lubricants can help some, but doesn't completely prevent tearing.

According to a 2010 study from the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB) that was authored by Debby Herbenick et al., although anal intercourse is reported by fewer women than other partnered sex behaviors, partnered women in the age groups between 18–49 are significantly more likely to report having anal sex in the past 90 days. Women engaged in anal intercourse less commonly than men. Vaginal intercourse was practiced more than insertive anal intercourse among men, but 13% to 15% of men aged 25 to 49 practiced insertive anal intercourse.[50][51]


4. With that said, here is something she will LOVE!!! Note: this technique requires the ability to continue trusting through her orgasms without cumming yourself, but it can cause her orgasm to be longer, or even trigger her to have her first “back to back” multiple orgasms if she doesn’t already!!! Before trying this, you must know your partner, know she is ok with anal, and that it is relatively comfortable for her because it works best when she has NO IDEA it’s coming. HERE WE GO… Have sex in a position that allows you easy access to the area and the ability to grab your penis. I prefer her on her side with me straddling her lover leg. (btw, this position can give maximum penetration, so if she likes it then slam it hard, BUT if you are longer than she is, be careful because you can cause her severe pain. Even if you have never hurt her from penetration depth before, sometimes you will with this position.) Get her worked up by getting her close and backing off a couple times until she is ready to explode!!! Then as she begins to orgasm continue to fully thrust until she is well into her orgasm, then (preferably before she comes down from her current orgasm) as quickly as possible pull out of her, line it up and gently but quickly (again, know your partner) slide your penis inside her rectum and begin thrusting in whatever way she likes. I have NEVER have a complaint from this as it tends to hold that orgasm longer while throwing her into another, often stronger orgasm. Even if it takes a few seconds and the orgasm subsides, she will likely orgasm again very quickly. With this technique, I have been told many times that this caused the anal orgasm to be significantly more intense than the vaginal ones preceding it .
“Awkwardness doesn’t mean you’re not close with your partner or in a healthy relationship, it’s because we’re taught from a young age that sex is a taboo topic,” Levkoff says. “Bringing up to a partner a potential thing that you want to try is going to be uncomfortable regardless of what it is. I think that we forget that a part of sexual intimacy means being vulnerable and being able to have those conversations. That’s a human thing. It’s part of being sexually mature.”
"The prostate is around three to four inches inside the rectum and about an inch in diameter," Glickman explains. "It's easier for a partner to find after a little flirting or foreplay because when the prostate is aroused it starts producing fluid that makes it fill up like a water balloon." Transgender women also have prostates, Glickman says, but if you're using hormones to transition, it may shrink and become less sensitive.
What risk are you talking about? This is an example of why saying “all, always, every”, etc… can make you look stupid. Especially since one form of “safety measure” is abstinence… and if you follow that one I’m REALLY having trouble spotting the risk!!! Not trying to sound like an A$$, but it sounds like the biggest thing you are at risk of is a mundane sex life.
You may need them to treat an infection, but some can kill the “good" bacteria that live in your bowels. You need those to keep your gut in natural balance, so diarrhea can be a common side effect. You also may be more likely to get a yeast infection while taking antibiotics. Ask your doctor if eating yogurt or taking a probiotic supplement may help.
Yes, cancer! Certain strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) can cause dysplasia, or atypical changes to cells. Those abnormal cells can over time become cancer. The medical community has routine screening guidelines in place for women to get yearly gynecological exams and regular pap smears to screen for pre-cancerous changes on the cervix. These standards of care help doctors catch these changes and treat them before cancer can develop on the cervix. Even dentists are now doing routine checks of the back of the throat and tonsils to screen for cancers caused by HPV transmitted through oral sex.
Since STDs can still be spread through both anal and oral sex, it is a good idea to use physical protection such as a condom to protect both yourself and your partner. Since the skin of the anus and rectum is thin, prone to tears, and not well lubricated, it may also be a good idea to use a water-based lubricant to protect these delicate regions from tissue damage. A lubricant cannot, however, completely prevent tearing or injury. With oral sex, no lubricant is suggested because most brands are not safe to ingest.

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^ Nussbaum, Martha C. (1994). "Platonic Love and Colorado Law: The Relevance of Ancient Greek Norms to Modern Sexual Controversies". Virginia Law Review. 80 (7): 1562–3. JSTOR 1073514. (Registration required (help)). the kinaidos is clearly a person who chronically plays the passive role [...] More recently, I have been convince by arguments of the late John J. Winkler that kinaidos usually connotes willingness to accept money for sex, as well as habitual passivity [...] In any case, there is no doubt that we are not dealing with an isolated act, but rather a type of person who habitually chooses activity that Callicles finds shameful. That, and no view about same-sex relations per se, is the basis of his criticism. In fact, Callicles is depicted as having a young boyfriend of his own. *The boyfriend is named Demos, also the name for the Athenian "people," to whom Callicles is also devoted. It is likely that the pun on the name is sexual: as Callicles seduces Demos, so also the demos. (It would be assumed that he would practice intercrural intercourse with this boyfriend, thus avoiding putting him in anything like the kinaidos shamed position
Most cases of anal cancer are related to infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV). Anal sex alone does not cause anal cancer; the risk of anal cancer through anal sex is attributed to HPV infection, which is often contracted through unprotected anal sex.[75] Anal cancer is relatively rare, and significantly less common than cancer of the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer); the American Cancer Society states that it affects approximately 7,060 people (4,430 in women and 2,630 in men) and results in approximately 880 deaths (550 in women and 330 in men) in the United States, and that, though anal cancer has been on the rise for many years, it is mainly diagnosed in adults, "with an average age being in the early 60s" and it "affects women somewhat more often than men."[75] Though anal cancer is serious, treatment for it is "often very effective" and most anal cancer patients can be cured of the disease; the American Cancer Society adds that "receptive anal intercourse also increases the risk of anal cancer in both men and women, particularly in those younger than the age of 30. Because of this, men who have sex with men have a high risk of this cancer."[75]
Fortunately, sex educators have met this rising demand with a wealth of how-to guides and things to keep in mind for those exploring anal. Unfortunately, many people dive right in without doing much research. That means, what little anal education many first timers have often comes from porn, where anal is often portrayed as easy: just shove an unlubricated toy or peen up an asshole, with no preparation, and pump hard for, like, an hour.
"People assume that those who try anal sex have to be gay, or that only men like to have anal, or that having anal is weird, shameful, and wrong because the butt is supposed to only be an 'exit,'" Van Kirk tells BuzzFeed Health. "But that's not true at all. Anyone can experiment with and enjoy anal. In fact, anal sex is the primary form of sex in some countries where birth control is not available to them."
"You want to use a condom, whether it’s actually on a human body or a strap on or another enhancement," Levkoff says. "Some people have more than one partner, and sometimes they use the same toy on different people. So you always want to play it safe, and obviously make sure your toys are washed as well. Not everyone gets tested and you want to do the smart thing here."
Reports regarding the prevalence of anal sex among gay men and other men who have sex with men vary. A survey in The Advocate in 1994 indicated that 46% of gay men preferred to penetrate their partners, while 43% preferred to be the receptive partner.[55] Other sources suggest that roughly three-fourths of gay men have had anal sex at one time or another, with an equal percentage participating as tops and bottoms.[55] A 2012 NSSHB sex survey in the U.S. suggests high lifetime participation in anal sex among gay men: 83.3% report ever taking part in anal sex in the insertive position and 90% in the receptive position, even if only between a third and a quarter self-report very recent engagement in the practice, defined as 30 days or less.[63]
During filming, they take cut breaks to apply lube, rarely shown on screen, address messes, and switch from anal back to vaginal sex without showing pre-switch cleaning, which is vital to avoid infections. They also, says self-described “aspiring anal queen” Della Dane, who entered porn last year, “do certain angles and positions for entertainment value that you wouldn’t normally do.” And rather than being ready for anal at any time, stars often need to take breaks of a few days or weeks between a given number of anal shoots. All-in-all, the eight-year industry vet Cherie DeVille told me last year, “you can’t expect your female partner at home to just be able to jump into” anal, especially porn-style anal; the same applies to men and non-binary folks as well.
"The anus is, after all, an exit, not an entrance, and so it could really, really hurt. This is not an act that should ever be undertaken with a random dude or at a random moment; you both have to want it, and you both have to be prepared. No assholes allowed in the asshole! I think that's one of the best parts of the whole ordeal. It takes so much time, trust, and communication that it just amplifies everything physical going on because you are so connected with your partner." —Tess N.
“I hate to say I'm not a big G-spot believer. There certainly are some nerves, but [research hasn’t] been able to anatomically demonstrate much on a regular basis,” Mary Jane Minkin, M.D., a clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at Yale Medical School, tells SELF. “I think women have areas that are more sensitive than others, individual exploration is good, and individuals can experience stimulation in all sorts of places."
Women may sexually stimulate a man's anus by fingering the exterior or interior areas of the anus; they may also stimulate the perineum (which, for males, is between the base of the scrotum and the anus), massage the prostate or engage in anilingus.[5][21][65] Sex toys, such as a dildo, may also be used.[5][21] The practice of a woman penetrating a man's anus with a strap-on dildo for sexual activity is called pegging.[20][66]
Receptive anal sex is much riskier for getting HIV. The bottom partner is 13 times more likely to get infected than the top. However, it’s possible for either partner to get HIV through anal sex from certain body fluids—blood, semen (cum), pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum), or rectal fluids—of a person who has HIV. Using condoms or medicines to protect against transmission can decrease this risk.
But porn anal, most in the adult industry will gladly tell you, is a fantasy. “Girls train their assholes in order to take the kind of crazy poundings they take on film,” says Skylar Snow, an adult performer who entered the industry last year. That training and prep is different for everyone, but usually it involves acclimating anuses with fingers or toys for hours or days before a scene, and using relaxation tricks. Some take supplements to keep their BMs regular, fasting, popping Imodium, and doing at least one enema in the half-day or day before a scene to minimize the risk of a fecal mishap. “The controlled environment of porn really does help,” says Joseline Kelly, who entered the industry in 2015. "Because, OK, I know I’m going to have anal with this person over here and at this time, so you just feel 100 percent ready” in a way you often can’t in real life.
^ Jump up to: a b See here and pages 48–49 for the majority of researchers and heterosexuals defining virginity loss/"technical virginity" by whether or not a person has engaged in vaginal sex. Laura M. Carpenter (2005). Virginity lost: an intimate portrait of first sexual experiences. NYU Press. pp. 295 pages. ISBN 978-0-8147-1652-6. Retrieved October 9, 2011.
If you decide to have penetrative anal sex, take things slowly and communicate with your partner. If you are giving anal sex, use plenty of lubricant and then start by penetrating just a little and then pulling out completely. When your partner is ready, penetrate a bit further and then pull out again. Continue with this until you are fully in – but be prepared to stop at any time if the other person is uncomfortable or in pain.
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