I have found that the 1st few times anal sex is tried. It is best not to pull in & out at all, when you’re partner says it’s okay to start moving, go in circles with the love muscle or strap on. Use the circular motion everytime , your partner will go in & out when the pain finally goes away all the way. Especially if the partner is extra small like me. I’m medically documented as being super small inside, everything small. My husband love’s it, but it puts me at higher risk of real injury. I understand the alarm that the 1 lady mentioned. I learned in high school sex ed. That both partners get micro tares upon intercourse. It’s worse when dry. So without proper/ lots of lube you can actually ripp a person open. The porn star laughs the internal stitches off. I read it all the time. Oh haha look what I can survive. So it’s really important to listen to the advice provided. Slow, slow, gentle, communication. If you get blood, like 1 comment mentioned. Then up the lube and slow the #@$!% down! ! As small as I am I’ve only had blood when disrespected. Scar tissue don’t stretch it rippes. I’ve had a hysterectomy, I know that 1st hand as well. If you’re partner has a really hard time understanding, try what I always have. Try switching the vulnerability roles. Don’t mush the person’s insides just because it’s been done to you. Be nice, and it can usually become a nice addition to your sex life. A man cannot understand until he’s man enough to allow a woman that kind of experience. And manly men? It is not gay!! You want what you want from women, truth is what’s good for the gander is good for the goose, you’ll open doors that never existed before. Keep in mind that a woman’s body changes up to 500 times per day, just because it’s going well doesn’t mean that it cannot become very painful 1/2 way through. Stay versatile and keep mutual pleasure going. It also hurts me to have a man pull out all the time. It resets the butt back to tight. Also, being too rough can and does cause prolapse. Thank God I’ve never been hurt that bad. I’ve cared for people with prolapse. I came out of the forest in 97 and was a c.n.a. for 4 yrs. My biggest problem is the total lack of meaningful medical sexual education. For instance, most female rectum is on average 6 inches long. The gut can move some hence the super slow start. But hey men some of us will never be able to take 10 plus inches balls deep up the ass. That doesn’t make us less of a woman, just means you boys have to step up be real men and give a shit.. if you do you’ll be able to give your woman the kind of rectal orgasms. That I get. If you can, boy hang on you might get a broken dick during something that strong. Well gotta go suck my husband, get some lovin.
Anal warts (also called condylomas) are growths that form just outside the anus and in the lower anal canal below the dentate line. Sometimes they can be found just above the dentate line. They're caused by infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). People who have or had anal warts are more likely to get anal cancer. (See “Potentially pre-cancerous anal conditions” below and Risk Factors for Anal cancer)
In a male receptive partner, being anally penetrated can produce a pleasurable sensation due to the inserted penis rubbing or brushing against the prostate through the anal wall.[4][11] This can result in pleasurable sensations and can lead to an orgasm in some cases.[4][11] Prostate stimulation can produce a deeper orgasm, sometimes described by men as more widespread and intense, longer-lasting, and allowing for greater feelings of ecstasy than orgasm elicited by penile stimulation only.[4][11] The prostate is located next to the rectum and is the larger, more developed male homologue (variation) to the female Skene's glands.[22] It is also typical for a man to not reach orgasm as a receptive partner solely from anal sex.[23][24]

As with other sexual practices, people without sound knowledge about the sexual risks involved are susceptible to STIs. Because of the view that anal sex is not "real sex" and therefore does not result in virginity loss, or pregnancy, teenagers and other young people may consider vaginal intercourse riskier than anal intercourse and believe that a STI can only result from vaginal intercourse.[79][80][81] It may be because of these views that condom use with anal sex is often reported to be low and inconsistent across all groups in various countries.[79]
^ Joann S. DeLora; Carol A. B. Warren; Carol Rinkleib Ellison (2008) [1981]. Understanding Sexual Interaction. Houghton Mifflin (Original from the University of Virginia). p. 123. ISBN 978-0-395-29724-7. Retrieved November 6, 2011. Many men find anal intercourse more exciting than penile-vaginal intercourse because the anal opening is usually smaller and tighter than the vagina. Probably the forbidden aspect of anal intercourse also makes it more exciting for some people.
There are two ways that we talk about anal intercourse:  receptive anal intercourse and insertive anal intercourse. “Receptive” refers to the person that is receiving penetration, and “insertive” refers to the person (male) who is providing penetration to the anus. There is also heterosexual versus homosexual anal intercourse; here, since we are concerned with pregnancy, we will mainly focus on heterosexual anal intercourse (man with a woman).
First, a few words about the survey. We shared this 15-question anonymous survey with our social media followers, on our website and in our newsletters—to reach a convenience sample of people connected to San Francisco AIDS Foundation. The 412 people who took the survey likely felt they had something to say about pain and sex. (In other words, the sample isn’t representative of our entire community or San Francisco.)
In a 2010 clinical review article of heterosexual anal sex, anal intercourse is used to specifically denote penile-anal penetration, and anal sex is used to denote any form of anal sexual activity. The review suggests that anal sex is exotic among the sexual practices of some heterosexuals and that "for a certain number of heterosexuals, anal intercourse is pleasurable, exciting, and perhaps considered more intimate than vaginal sex".[6]

People who are HIV-negative and at very high risk for HIV can take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), if taken consistently, can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Since PrEP is not 100% effective at preventing HIV, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk. Only condoms can help protect against other STDs.
CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the abdomen or chest, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography. For anal cancer, a CT scan of the pelvis and abdomen may be done.
Although few cancers are totally preventable, avoiding risk factors and getting regular checkups are important. Using condoms may reduce, but not get rid of the risk of HPV infection. HPV vaccines (for those ages 9 to 26) have been shown to not only lower the risk of HPV infection, but also reduce the risk of anal cancer in men and women. People at increased risk should talk to their physicians about getting an anal cancer screening. During this test, your physician swabs the anal lining, looking at the cells under a microscope for anything unusual. Other forms of screening include looking closely at the area during a surgery, or in the office with a special scope to look in the anal canal. Early identification and treatment of precancerous areas may help prevent anal cancer. 
One of the biggest trepidations people have about trying anal sex is that "that's where the poop comes from." But that's actually not 100% true, Pitagora says. "Concerns about dirtiness or messiness are not as relevant as you might think because feces are not stored where anal sex happens (near the anus and rectum), but in the upper bowels," they say.
18. “OK. Imagine that you are a kid at school, and you get your school lunch every day. Every day the lunch lady gives you an apple and an orange, and then tells you not to eat the orange. So every day, you eat your apple, and leave your orange sitting on the tray. You love apples. Apples are fucking amazing, you love eating them every day. But every day, for weeks, for months, for years, while you’re eating that apple, there’s an orange right there, inches away, staring you in the face.You’ve never tasted an orange before, and you wonder what it’s like. Is it as good as an apple? Is it different or the same? Around you, you can see that a few other kids are eating their oranges; they seem to be happy about it. You have a friend who’s always going on about how awesome oranges are, how the orange he ate last week was spectacular. And you love your apple; you really do. But after years of that orange staring you right in the face, of watching other people eat their oranges and love them, you just want to eat the fucking orange and see what all the fuss is about.”

Stimulation from anal sex can additionally be affected by popular perception or portrayals of the activity, such as erotica or pornography. In pornography, anal sex is commonly portrayed as a desirable, painless routine that does not require personal lubricant; this can result in couples performing anal sex without care, and men and women believing that it is unusual for women, as receptive partners, to find discomfort or pain instead of pleasure from the activity.[6][38][39][40] By contrast, each person's sphincter muscles react to penetration differently, the anal sphincters have tissues that are more prone to tearing, and the anus and rectum do not provide lubrication for sexual penetration like the vagina does. Researchers say adequate application of a personal lubricant, relaxation, and communication between sexual partners are crucial to avoid pain or damage to the anus or rectum.[2][13][41] Additionally, ensuring that the anal area is clean and the bowel is empty, for both aesthetics and practicality, may be desired by participants.[21]
It's all about getting there in the way that works for you, and then having fun with it. "Anal sex is great when you've been properly warmed up," says Angela White, an award-winning adult star. "That doesn't mean ramming a couple of dry fingers into my rectum and calling it foreplay. The anus is not self-lubricating like a pussy so you need to either use lubricants or provide plenty of spit. Also, if you're not man or woman enough to stick your tongue in my butthole then you're not sticking anything else in there," White says.
"I used to be obsessed with anal. At one point in high school, I was having more anal than regular sex. When done right—and by right I mean when the guy doesn't shove his d*ck into you like a horse in heat—anal can teeter on that dangerous line between pleasure and pain. He feels bigger than ever and completely fills you up. As he's going in, you have to hold your breath because you feel like your body doesn't have room for air and his d*ck at the same time, but once he's in, the pleasure radiates through your whole body." —Nina T.

Inadequately cleaned toys can serve as a reservoir for bacterial growth and even some viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a condom with toys – even if you don’t share your toys – will reduce the risk of infections. Hepatitis C, furthermore, can survive as a miniscule drop of dried blood on a toy (or other object) for up to 3 months and become reactivated when wet. (If your eyes aren’t bulging, go back and re-read that last sentence.) (Side note: that’s why sharing cocaine straws is a very real method of Hep C transmission: cocaine causes micro-tears in the nose, leaving invisible specs of blood on the straw that harbor the virus for up to 3 months.) So instead of scrubbing your toys with a nail brush or boiling them compulsively, just use a condom and rinse them off in warm, soapy water afterwards.
The fear that anal sex will loosen you up somehow and leave you farting and shitting all over the place is totally unfounded. Take it from Hutcherson. “The thing I can say…as a doctor is, it’s not unsafe. She’s not going to be wearing a diaper, she’s not going to have faecal incontinence, she’s not going to be soiling herself or passing gas all day.”
But you can't just slide into anal sex (unless you're using plenty of lube...but more on that later). If you don't know what you're doing and you aren't careful, you could hurt yourself or your partner because the anus is sensitive. "Contrary to what many believe, anal sex does not have to be painful (unless people engaging in it want it to be)," says Dulcinea Pitagora, a sex therapist known as the Kink Doctor. So before you give anal a try, read our tips about how to prep, both physically and mentally.
There is less research on anal sexual activity among women who have sex with women compared to couples of other sexual orientations. In 1987, a non-scientific study (Munson) was conducted of more than 100 members of a lesbian social organization in Colorado. When asked what techniques they used in their last ten sexual encounters, lesbians in their 30s were twice as likely as other age groups to engage in anal stimulation (with a finger or dildo).[2] A 2014 study of partnered lesbian women in Canada and the U.S. found that 7% engaged in anal stimulation or penetration at least once a week; about 10% did so monthly and 70% did not at all.[70] Anilingus is also less often practiced among female same-sex couples.[71][72]
Different cultures have had different views on anal sex throughout human history, with some cultures more positive about the activity than others.[5][52][97] Historically, anal sex has been restricted or condemned, especially with regard to religious beliefs; it has also commonly been used as a form of domination, usually with the active partner (the one who is penetrating) representing masculinity and the passive partner (the one who is being penetrated) representing femininity.[5][7][52] A number of cultures have especially recorded the practice of anal sex between males, and anal sex between males has been especially stigmatized or punished.[7][57][98] In some societies, if discovered to have engaged in the practice, the individuals involved were put to death, such as by decapitation, burning, or even mutilation.[5]
Endless hours of assfucking films where teens with braces and spex let their boyfriends put their throbbing dicks anywhere. Horny stepdaughters lubing big black cocks with saliva before shoving them deep inside their craving buttholes. Behold slutty schoolgirls who love showing off their lustful bodies in the classroom before having insane anal sex with their teachers.
While there’s no need to get uber-paranoid about the way you look, smell and taste – we’re all people with the same, sometimes-funky human parts, after all – a nice warm shower with soap is a good idea before you engage in any butt play. Lather yourself up with a mild, non-irritating body wash and scrub until you feel squeaky clean. You can even do this with your partner, for some built-in foreplay.
Inadequately cleaned toys can serve as a reservoir for bacterial growth and even some viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a condom with toys – even if you don’t share your toys – will reduce the risk of infections. Hepatitis C, furthermore, can survive as a miniscule drop of dried blood on a toy (or other object) for up to 3 months and become reactivated when wet. (If your eyes aren’t bulging, go back and re-read that last sentence.) (Side note: that’s why sharing cocaine straws is a very real method of Hep C transmission: cocaine causes micro-tears in the nose, leaving invisible specs of blood on the straw that harbor the virus for up to 3 months.) So instead of scrubbing your toys with a nail brush or boiling them compulsively, just use a condom and rinse them off in warm, soapy water afterwards.
Spreading STIs. Infections and diseases that are shared during sexual intercourse — such as HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and herpes — can be shared through anal sex. In fact, anal sex is the sexual behavior for transmitting and getting HIV for both men and women. People on the receiving end (or “the bottom”) of anal sex are more likely to become infected with HIV than the inserting partner (or “the top”).
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