Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) means taking antiretroviral medicines—medicines used to treat HIV—after being potentially exposed to HIV during sex to prevent becoming infected. PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours after a possible exposure to HIV, but the sooner the better. PEP must be taken once or twice daily for 28 days. When administered correctly, PEP is effective in preventing HIV, but not 100%. To obtain PEP, contact your health care provider, your local or state health department, or go to an emergency room.
First, I’m going to talk about some of the fundamental tips for having great anal sex, then we’re going to cover the actual anal sex techniques and positions you should be using during the act. If you want to skip straight to the anal sex techniques and positions section, click here. I have also created a separate guide here on how to full prepare your body for anal sex (hygiene, etc.).
Spreading STIs. Infections and diseases that are shared during sexual intercourse — such as HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and herpes — can be shared through anal sex. In fact, anal sex is the sexual behavior for transmitting and getting HIV for both men and women. People on the receiving end (or “the bottom”) of anal sex are more likely to become infected with HIV than the inserting partner (or “the top”).
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