If you decide to have penetrative anal sex, take things slowly and communicate with your partner. If you are giving anal sex, use plenty of lubricant and then start by penetrating just a little and then pulling out completely. When your partner is ready, penetrate a bit further and then pull out again. Continue with this until you are fully in – but be prepared to stop at any time if the other person is uncomfortable or in pain.
12. You're going to freak the fuck out that you're pooping but you're not. Honestly, it becomes hard to tell if you are or aren't; additionally, this Tucker Max story was not helpful for my butt sex-phobia. You're probably not gonna poop. If there's a little bit of poop, as my partner said, it's not a big deal, because "[he] asked for this." (There wasn't.)
Some Love It, Some Don’t – Some women really adore anal sex. They find it incredibly pleasurable, while others don’t find it pleasurable at all. It comes down to personal preference, so if you try it and don’t enjoy it, that’s fine. There’s no need to stress about it if you don’t get much stimulation from it. Instead, try something else from the Bad Girls Bible.

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I think the fear of pain for anal is understandable it is a true sense of fear I honestly had it for a long time because I had a previous partner before my husband tear me cause he went to vigorous so I understand the fear of anal it’s the more logical fear to meotherwise this article was helpful with helping figure out how to overcome the pain I had previous in anal so thank you very much it helped
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
The anus lacks the natural lubrication the vagina has. Penetration can tear the tissue inside the anus, allowing bacteria and viruses to enter the bloodstream. This can result in the spread of sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Studies have suggested that anal exposure to HIV poses 30 times more risk for the receptive partner than vaginal exposure. Exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV) may also lead to the development of anal warts and anal cancer. Using lubricants can help some, but doesn't completely prevent tearing.
Their purpose is to provide information on diseases and processes, rather than dictate a specific form of treatment. They are intended for the use of all practitioners, health care workers and patients who desire information about the management of the conditions addressed. It should be recognized that these brochures should not be deemed inclusive of all proper methods of care or exclusive of methods of care reasonably directed to obtain the same results. The ultimate judgment regarding the propriety of any specific procedure must be made by the physician in light of all the circumstances presented by the individual patient. 
You don’t need to. As we just established, the chances of you pooping on your partner mid-act are slim to none. But there’s usually no harm in doing an enema as long as you're not doing it often enough to irritate your rectum, Dr. Frankhouse says. He recommends only doing them once every few months and following the instructions every time. If your butt starts feeling irritated when you do enemas, that's a sign you should quit.
Latex or polyurethane male condoms are highly effective in preventing HIV and certain other STDs when used correctly from start to finish for each act of anal sex. People who report using condoms consistently reduced their risk of getting HIV through insertive anal sex with an HIV-positive partner, on average, by 63%, and receptive anal sex with an HIV-positive partner, on average, by 72%. Condoms are much less effective when not used consistently. It is also important that sufficient water- or silicone-based lubricant be used during anal sex to prevent condom breakage and tearing of tissue. Female nitrile condoms can also prevent HIV and some other STDs. Since condoms are not 100% effective, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk.
6. Throw other stimulation into the mix. Listen, they don't make those wild-looking, three-pronged sex toys for nothing. Once you're in the groove of things, add in some clit stimulation, some vaginal stimulation, or heck, all three. Some women say this combo feels overstimulating in the best way. In any case, most women need some combination of stimulation to orgasm—whether that's clit/vaginal, or anal/clit+vaginal is totally subjective. But isn't it fun to learn new things about your own orgasms?

Then, when you feel cool, calm, and ready to start exploring anal play, you or your partner can use a finger or sex toy to massage the outside of your anus. This can help you get familiar with the sensation before any kind of penetration happens. Once you’re beginning to enjoy yourself, Dr. Chinn says you can experiment with sticking a finger or sex toy in your anus bit by bit based on what feels good, using plenty of lube, of course.
It can be scary when you're trying something new, especially when it involves a body part you're not use to anyone touching. But try to relax as much as possible, because it will make anal sex better, Pitagora says. "Anoreceptive sex is enhanced by an openness to the experience, trust of the insertive partner, an associated sense of arousal, and the ability to overcome the stereotypical taboo," they once wrote in a paper. Bottom line, do whatever it takes to feel as comfortable as possible, because when you're relaxed you'll enjoy the experience more.
Anal sex has been more accepted in modern times; it is often considered a natural, pleasurable form of sexual expression.[5][7][97] Some people, men in particular, are only interested in anal sex for sexual satisfaction, which has been partly attributed to the buttocks and anus being more eroticized in modern culture, including via pornography.[52] Engaging in anal sex is still, however, punished in some societies.[7][99] For example, regarding LGBT rights in Iran, Iran's Penal Code states in Article 109 that "both men involved in same-sex penetrative (anal) or non-penetrative sex will be punished" and "Article 110 states that those convicted of engaging in anal sex will be executed and that the manner of execution is at the discretion of the judge".[99]
21. “I had anal sex with my boyfriend for the first time a month ago. It was my five-year anniversary gift to him and it wasn’t great for me, but I let him keep going because I’m good for my word. When he pulled out after what seemed like a decade, a little poop came out. I was pretty mortified, but my boyfriend made me feel okay about it. I don’t think we’ll be doing it again any time soon, but the experience brought us closer together.” — Lilly, 29
Oral sex and mutual masturbation are more common than anal stimulation among men in sexual relationships with other men.[1][53][64] According to Weiten et al., anal intercourse is generally more popular among gay male couples than among heterosexual couples, but "it ranks behind oral sex and mutual masturbation" among both sexual orientations in prevalence.[1] Wellings et al. reported that "the equation of 'homosexual' with 'anal' sex among men is common among lay and health professionals alike" and that "yet an Internet survey of 180,000 MSM across Europe (EMIS, 2011) showed that oral sex was most commonly practised, followed by mutual masturbation, with anal intercourse in third place".[9]
Christian texts may sometimes euphemistically refer to anal sex as the peccatum contra naturam (the sin against nature, after Thomas Aquinas) or Sodomitica luxuria (sodomitical lusts, in one of Charlemagne's ordinances), or peccatum illud horribile, inter christianos non nominandum (that horrible sin that among Christians is not to be named).[130][131][132]

One person described it as “like getting a tattoo: It hurts, but you know you still love it.” Another person compared it to popping a painful pimple: “The first few seconds can sting, but the sense of relief and endorphins rush immediately afterwards floods out the momentary ‘pain.’” A few other people compared it to the pain you experience when working out. “It hurts because it’s a muscle being stretched. When you first work out, your muscles hurt because they’re being stretched, but you feel good. Similar good feeling but exponentially better.”
Gay men who prefer anal sex may view it as their version of intercourse and a natural expression of intimacy that is capable of providing pleasure.[19][53][57] The notion that it might resonate with gay men with the same emotional significance that vaginal sex resonates with heterosexuals has also been considered.[57][58] Some men who have sex with men, however, believe that being a receptive partner during anal sex questions their masculinity.[59][60]
So you want to try anal sex. That's great! Anal play can be lots of fun — if you're ready for it. Unlike other types of sex, which most people can fumble their way through when they don't have much experience, anal sex takes some research. (And, to be clear, it's always better to think and talk through any new sexual experience before you try it with a partner).
First, a few words about the survey. We shared this 15-question anonymous survey with our social media followers, on our website and in our newsletters—to reach a convenience sample of people connected to San Francisco AIDS Foundation. The 412 people who took the survey likely felt they had something to say about pain and sex. (In other words, the sample isn’t representative of our entire community or San Francisco.)

One person described it as “like getting a tattoo: It hurts, but you know you still love it.” Another person compared it to popping a painful pimple: “The first few seconds can sting, but the sense of relief and endorphins rush immediately afterwards floods out the momentary ‘pain.’” A few other people compared it to the pain you experience when working out. “It hurts because it’s a muscle being stretched. When you first work out, your muscles hurt because they’re being stretched, but you feel good. Similar good feeling but exponentially better.”
^ Weiss, Margaret D.; Wasdell, Michael B.; Bomben, Melissa M.; Rea, Kathleen J.; Freeman, Roger D.; Xue, H; Yang, H; Zhang, G; Shao, C (February 2006). "High Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Jiangsu Province, China". Sex Transm Dis. 33 (2): 118–123. doi:10.1097/01.olq.0000199763.14766.2b. PMID 16432484.
1. Relax those booty muscles. There are a bunch of li'l muscles around your anus that can be pretty tight if you're not relaxed. And as logic follows, if those muscles and your anal sphincter are tight, inserting anything can be painful and difficult rather than pleasurable and easy. Try something like deep breathing or a relaxing massage with your partner to make sure both you and your bum muscles are sufficiently chilled out, pre-anal play.
Many men also like having their prostate stimulated. The prostate is a walnut-sized gland located just below the bladder and is highly sensitive to stimulation (usually gentle finger stimulation through the anus). However, there are many blood vessels in and around the prostate and it can get bruised if handled roughly, so always treat it gently and use lots of lube.
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