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In addition to nerve endings, pleasure from anal intercourse may be aided by the close proximity between the anus and the prostate for males, and vagina, clitoral legs and anal area for females. This is because of indirect stimulation of the prostate and vagina or clitoral legs.[7][8][9] For a male insertive partner, the tightness of the anus can be a source of pleasure via the tactile pressure on the penis.[10][11] Pleasure from the anus can also be achieved through anal masturbation, fingering,[3] facesitting, anilingus, and other penetrative and non-penetrative acts. Anal stretching or fisting is pleasurable for some, but it poses a more serious threat of damage due to the deliberate stretching of the anal and rectal tissues; its injuries include anal sphincter lacerations and rectal and sigmoid colon (rectosigmoid) perforation, which might result in death.[12] Lubricant and condoms are widely regarded as a necessity while performing anal sex as well as a slow and cautious penetration.[13]
Using a new condom is especially important if you’re switching from anal to vaginal penetration so you can avoid moving bacteria from your anus to your vagina or urethra. Your anus is home to all kinds of bacteria your vagina and related parts aren’t used to—namely, gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, like E. coli. When this bacteria reaches your vagina, it can cause vaginal infections, like bacterial vaginosis, which can lead to vaginal itching, burning during urination, a “fishy” vaginal odor, and gray, white, or green vaginal discharge, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can also spread to your urethra, where it can cause a urinary tract infection. According to the Mayo Clinic, this can cause symptoms like constantly needing to pee, then a burning sensation when you do, along with cloudy urine and pelvic pain.
It can be scary when you're trying something new, especially when it involves a body part you're not use to anyone touching. But try to relax as much as possible, because it will make anal sex better, Pitagora says. "Anoreceptive sex is enhanced by an openness to the experience, trust of the insertive partner, an associated sense of arousal, and the ability to overcome the stereotypical taboo," they once wrote in a paper. Bottom line, do whatever it takes to feel as comfortable as possible, because when you're relaxed you'll enjoy the experience more.
Historically, anal sex has been commonly associated with male homosexuality. However, many gay men and men who have sex with men in general (those who identify as gay, bisexual, heterosexual or have not identified their sexual identity) do not engage in anal sex.[8][9][53][54] Among men who have anal sex with other men, the insertive partner may be referred to as the top and the one being penetrated may be referred to as the bottom. Those who enjoy either role may be referred to as versatile.[55][56]
Condoms – Unprotected anal sex is considered a high-risk activity for spreading sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) and disease [9], more so than vaginal sex [10], because the anus is more delicate that the vagina [11]. In fact, the CDC considers anal sex the riskiest sexual activity for transmitting HIV [12], especially as the receiver who is 13 times more likely to contract HIV [13].
There are little published data on how many heterosexual men would like their anus to be sexually stimulated in a heterosexual relationship. Anecdotally, it is a substantial number. What data we do have almost all relate to penetrative sexual acts, and the superficial contact of the anal ring with fingers or the tongue is even less well documented but may be assumed to be a common sexual activity for men of all sexual orientations.[67]
"I was always afraid it would hurt, but anal sex actually isn’t so much painful as it is uncomfortable. But! The discomfort is so extreme for some people that they can barely do it—like my best friend, who’s tried a few times with her fiancé and barely gotten it in, no matter how much lube they use. The key, apparently, is to be relaxed, which you really aren’t gonna be—in fact, knowing it’s about to happen will make you tense up more than usual—unless you happen to love it.
4. Get a water-based lube. Sexologist Jill McDevitt says to secure a quality water-based lube ahead of time. This will make rubbing and massaging even better. Even if your foreplay doesn’t involve penetration for now, lube makes everything better and can increase sensitivity. A great option is Lelo’s water-based lube—it’s slippery enough that it won’t gunk up on you, and it looks chic AF.
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5. You're gonna wanna be vocal during this process. Even if you're normally very quiet during sex, this is a time you'll wanna speak up—especially your first time trying it out with a new partner. Tell them if they're going too fast (or too slow—see point 10 below), if you feel like you're literally about to poop everywhere, or if you're experiencing pain/discomfort. Also, tell them if it feels good! If you're feeling nervous, chances are your partner is, too. Positive feedback—we love it!
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