There is less research on anal sexual activity among women who have sex with women compared to couples of other sexual orientations. In 1987, a non-scientific study (Munson) was conducted of more than 100 members of a lesbian social organization in Colorado. When asked what techniques they used in their last ten sexual encounters, lesbians in their 30s were twice as likely as other age groups to engage in anal stimulation (with a finger or dildo).[2] A 2014 study of partnered lesbian women in Canada and the U.S. found that 7% engaged in anal stimulation or penetration at least once a week; about 10% did so monthly and 70% did not at all.[70] Anilingus is also less often practiced among female same-sex couples.[71][72]
"People assume that those who try anal sex have to be gay, or that only men like to have anal, or that having anal is weird, shameful, and wrong because the butt is supposed to only be an 'exit,'" Van Kirk tells BuzzFeed Health. "But that's not true at all. Anyone can experiment with and enjoy anal. In fact, anal sex is the primary form of sex in some countries where birth control is not available to them."
7. “It’s tighter around the actual butthole itself then less so deeper in. I’ve tried it with my partner a few times, but have never managed to cum from it because it doesn’t stimulate the more sensitive parts on the end of my penis enough. You might find that you enjoy it less then PiV, but you may also find that the hotness of it does it for you.”

The anus (from Latin anus meaning "ring", "circle") is an opening at the opposite end of an animal's digestive tract from the mouth. Its function is to control the expulsion of feces, unwanted semi-solid matter produced during digestion, which, depending on the type of animal, may include: matter which the animal cannot digest, such as bones;[1] food material after all the nutrients have been extracted, for example cellulose or lignin; ingested matter which would be toxic if it remained in the digestive tract; and dead or excess gut bacteria and other endosymbionts.
Reports regarding the prevalence of anal sex among gay men and other men who have sex with men vary. A survey in The Advocate in 1994 indicated that 46% of gay men preferred to penetrate their partners, while 43% preferred to be the receptive partner.[55] Other sources suggest that roughly three-fourths of gay men have had anal sex at one time or another, with an equal percentage participating as tops and bottoms.[55] A 2012 NSSHB sex survey in the U.S. suggests high lifetime participation in anal sex among gay men: 83.3% report ever taking part in anal sex in the insertive position and 90% in the receptive position, even if only between a third and a quarter self-report very recent engagement in the practice, defined as 30 days or less.[63]
Some infections can cause problems during pregnancy, such as Giardia (giardiasis) and Group B Streptococcus (GBS), among others. Giardia can cause chronic diarrhea which may lead to dehydration and malnutrition, both of which can be dangerous during pregnancy both for the mother and fetus. GBS may be transmitted to the baby during delivery and can lead to an infection in the infant. Both Giardia and GBS often colonize the rectum and can be spread to the vaginal tract if vaginal or oral sex follows anal sex, or if there is any touching (hands or genitals) after anal sex.
So you want to try anal sex. That's great! Anal play can be lots of fun — if you're ready for it. Unlike other types of sex, which most people can fumble their way through when they don't have much experience, anal sex takes some research. (And, to be clear, it's always better to think and talk through any new sexual experience before you try it with a partner).
Unlike vaginas, buttholes don't produce their own lubrication — so you have to help them along. Pitagora suggests using a water-based lubricant like K-Y Jelly or Astroglide. If you're not using silicone sex toys, you can also use a silicone-based lubricant, which tends to be more slick and lasts longer. But, if you're using condoms, avoid oil-based lubricants (like Vaseline) because they can damage the condom.

The risk of getting HIV varies widely depending on the type of sexual activity. Anal sex (intercourse), which involves inserting the penis into the anus, carries the highest risk of transmitting HIV if either partner is HIV-positive. You can lower your risk for getting and transmitting HIV by using condoms the right way every time you have sex; choosing lower risk sexual activities; taking daily medicine to prevent HIV, called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); and taking medicines to treat HIV if you have HIV, called antiretroviral therapy (ART).
I really want to enjoy anal sex with my husband, but can’t seem to get over that feeling of needing to go to the bathroom. I’m terrified something may come out while we do it. What’s the best way to get past that “gotta poo” feeling? We want to work up to double penetration, but that’s not going to be possible until I can work through this. BTW – I’m absolutely loving your content. Very helpful!
A clinical trial is a study to answer a scientific question, such as whether one treatment is better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned in the laboratory. Each trial answers certain scientific questions in order to find new and better ways to help cancer patients. During treatment clinical trials, information is collected about the effects of a new treatment and how well it works. If a clinical trial shows that a new treatment is better than one currently being used, the new treatment may become "standard." Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.
Water Based Lube – As you can probably guess, water-based lube is made of mostly water. This makes it safe for anal sex, but it’s not perfect. The problem with water based lube is that it dries out quickly and then needs to be reapplied. Stopping to reapply lube can obviously ruin the vibe. You CAN use water based lubes with latex condoms as it does not degrade them. It’s also easy to wash out.
It's important that we talk about all kinds of sex because not everyone is having, or wants to have, "penis in the vagina" sex. If you do have "penis in the vagina" sex and are curious about something else, or are finding that that type of sex is not for you and you'd just like to explore other options, it's helpful to know the facts. Even if you do learn more and decide anal sex is not a thing you'd like to try, it doesn't hurt to have the information.
"The anus is, after all, an exit, not an entrance, and so it could really, really hurt. This is not an act that should ever be undertaken with a random dude or at a random moment; you both have to want it, and you both have to be prepared. No assholes allowed in the asshole! I think that's one of the best parts of the whole ordeal. It takes so much time, trust, and communication that it just amplifies everything physical going on because you are so connected with your partner." —Tess N.
Unfortunately, there’s a bit of a catch here. When you poop, your body should expel all the stool in your rectum, but some fecal matter might get left behind. While you probably don’t have to worry about pooping on your partner, you should know that they may be exposed to some visible or invisible fecal matter, Dr. Chinn says. No one needs to panic. It’s as simple as washing it off with soap and water (or changing the condom), washing your hands, and continuing on with your life, whether or not that means getting back to anal sex. But it’s definitely something that all parties should be aware of before you start.

In anal play, once you get past your anus, anal sex takes place in your rectum, which isn’t really a storage area for poop unless a bowel movement is imminent. That means the odds of you actually pooping on your partner mid-act are very, very low, Dr. Moritz says. If you’ve recently pooped and you don’t have any health issues that make pooping a bit less predictable, like ulcerative colitis, a ton of feces probably won’t sneak up on you mid-anal.
Male-male anal sex was not a universally accepted practice in Ancient Greece; it was the target of jokes in some Athenian comedies.[106] Aristophanes, for instance, mockingly alludes to the practice, claiming, "Most citizens are europroktoi (wide-arsed) now."[107] The terms kinaidos, europroktoi, and katapygon were used by Greek residents to categorize men who chronically[108] practiced passive anal intercourse.[109] While pedagogic pederasty was an essential element in the education of male youths, these relationships, at least in Athens and Sparta, were expected to steer clear of penetrative sex of any kind. Greek artwork of sexual interaction between men and boys usually depicted fondling or intercrural sex, which was not condemned for violating or feminizing boys,[110] while male-male anal intercourse was usually depicted between males of the same age-group.[111] Intercrural sex was not considered penetrative and two males engaging in it was considered a "clean" act.[106] Some sources explicitly state that anal sex between men and boys was criticized as shameful and seen as a form of hubris.[110][112] Evidence suggests, however, that the younger partner in pederastic relationships (i.e., the eromenos) did engage in receptive anal intercourse so long as no one accused him of being 'feminine'.[113]

The anus is the end of the large intestine, below the rectum, through which stool (solid waste) leaves the body. The anus is formed partly from the outer skin layers of the body and partly from the intestine. Two ring-like muscles, called sphincter muscles, open and close the anal opening and let stool pass out of the body. The anal canal, the part of the anus between the rectum and the anal opening, is about 1-1½ inches long.
Anal sex being more common among heterosexuals today than it was previously has been linked to the increase in consumption of anal pornography among men, especially among those who view it on a regular basis.[39][40][52] Seidman et al. argued that "cheap, accessible and, especially, interactive media have enabled many more people to produce as well as consume pornography", and that this modern way of producing pornography, in addition to the buttocks and anus having become more eroticized, has led to a significant interest in or obsession with anal sex among men.[52]
Most anal cancers are cured with combination therapy. If caught early, many cancers that come back after nonsurgical treatment are treated effectively with surgery. While combination radiation/chemotherapy produces more side effects, this approach also results in the best long-term survival rates. After completing this treatment, as many as 70-90% of patients are still alive and cancer free at 5 years.
I think the fear of pain for anal is understandable it is a true sense of fear I honestly had it for a long time because I had a previous partner before my husband tear me cause he went to vigorous so I understand the fear of anal it’s the more logical fear to meotherwise this article was helpful with helping figure out how to overcome the pain I had previous in anal so thank you very much it helped
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
9. Between thin water-based lubes (like Astroglide) and thicker ones (KY), go with the thicker ones, because they don't dry out as quickly. In sex educator Tristan Taormino's crazy-helpful Ultimate Guide to Anal Sex for Women, she mentions that Crisco has been a favorite of the LGBT community for a long time, but it's bad to use with condoms because it can eventually poke tiny holes in the latex.
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