Oral sex is generally only deemed “likely safe” during pregnancy if you are in a mutually monogamous relationship in which both of you have tested negative for STDs. For those who choose a new sexual partner or have multiple sexual partners during pregnancy, there is the risk of contracting STDs, of which many can negatively affect a pregnancy and the developing fetus.
Three words: lube, lube, lube. Do not – we repeat, DO NOT – attempt anal sex without copious amounts of lube on hand. Slather on your partner’s penis, your entire backdoor area, inside the opening of your anus, his fingers, your fingers, and anything that’s going to go anywhere near your booty. Dr Hutcherson recommends using a silicone-based lubricant, rather than a glycerine or water-based one, as it will last longer and be less messy.
Yes, cancer! Certain strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) can cause dysplasia, or atypical changes to cells. Those abnormal cells can over time become cancer. The medical community has routine screening guidelines in place for women to get yearly gynecological exams and regular pap smears to screen for pre-cancerous changes on the cervix. These standards of care help doctors catch these changes and treat them before cancer can develop on the cervix. Even dentists are now doing routine checks of the back of the throat and tonsils to screen for cancers caused by HPV transmitted through oral sex.
"People assume that those who try anal sex have to be gay, or that only men like to have anal, or that having anal is weird, shameful, and wrong because the butt is supposed to only be an 'exit,'" Van Kirk tells BuzzFeed Health. "But that's not true at all. Anyone can experiment with and enjoy anal. In fact, anal sex is the primary form of sex in some countries where birth control is not available to them."

"I've tried it before and actually learned to relax and enjoy it, but only with one particular guy. He loves anal sex and was very experienced! The difference with him is that he made his priority to make sure I was relaxed, that I trusted him and was having fun. I tried it again with another person and had to shut that down immediately as that level of trust or care was absent. Although the physical dalliance between Mr. Anal Sex guy and I have stopped for a few years, we're still friends who check up on each other!" says Penelope from Los Angeles.

But you can't just slide into anal sex (unless you're using plenty of lube...but more on that later). If you don't know what you're doing and you aren't careful, you could hurt yourself or your partner because the anus is sensitive. "Contrary to what many believe, anal sex does not have to be painful (unless people engaging in it want it to be)," says Dulcinea Pitagora, a sex therapist known as the Kink Doctor. So before you give anal a try, read our tips about how to prep, both physically and mentally.
I’ve had a lot of anal sex before with women who were already experienced and I tried it with my current girlfriend for the first time. She was a bit drunk and on her period and was having a hard time giving me a blow job so she told me to do her wherever I wanted. I asked where she wanted and suggested tits or ass, she said she was down for ass if I wanted it. I told her what I wanted (ass) because it feels so good so she asked where the lube was and I got it.
The information presented on The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) website is solely intended to provide you with information that will help educate you on various conditions. No information provided on this website or otherwise offered by ASCRS is intended to replace or in any way modify the advice of your health care professional.
First, a few words about the survey. We shared this 15-question anonymous survey with our social media followers, on our website and in our newsletters—to reach a convenience sample of people connected to San Francisco AIDS Foundation. The 412 people who took the survey likely felt they had something to say about pain and sex. (In other words, the sample isn’t representative of our entire community or San Francisco.)
A different kind of sex toy is a vibrator. Vibrators run on electricity or batteries, and they vibrate (buzz) when you turn them on. Many people like the feeling of vibrations on their genitals, especially the clitoris, penis, and anus. Vibrators also come in different shapes, materials, and sizes. Some are shaped so they can be inserted into a vagina or anus. Others are designed to be used on the outside of your body, like on the clitoris or penis. People can get vibrators and other sex toys online, in some drugstores, and at “adult shops” (you may have to be at least 18 years old to go into some stores that sell sex toys).
You can sort and catalogue all your favorite backdoor sex videos with ease by marking videos as your favs or creating an out-of-this-world playlist for all your ass-tastic needs. Custom playlists let you highlight what you want to see again and again and you can show the world you’re a true ass man! Video playback options, related video and category tags help you discover a new world of anal bliss. Our hardcore cuties are happy to take it in any hole. Watch as they grind tight hairy pussy on hard dicks in anticipation for a deep butt banging! Will they get get what they want or will it be too much to take?
When picking a lube from the shelf, you’ll see that some of them contain spermicide. The point of this ingredient is to kill sperm and prevent pregnancy, which has little risk with anal activity. However, most lube that is spermicidal has ingredients that are harsh on your sensitive genital and anal cavities [1] [2], and even lube without spermicide can damage cells [3]. This damage makes it easier to contract STIs such as HIV [4]. Avoid lube with spermicide for anal or any other sexual activity
People who are HIV-negative and at very high risk for HIV can take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), if taken consistently, can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Since PrEP is not 100% effective at preventing HIV, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk. Only condoms can help protect against other STDs.
"You want to use a condom, whether it’s actually on a human body or a strap on or another enhancement," Levkoff says. "Some people have more than one partner, and sometimes they use the same toy on different people. So you always want to play it safe, and obviously make sure your toys are washed as well. Not everyone gets tested and you want to do the smart thing here."
So definitely don't shame yourself, your partners, or other people for wanting to try anal or enjoying it. "There’s actually very little fecal matter in that area of the rectum and the cleanup is similar to vaginal sex," she says. "The problem is a lot of people have bad experiences when they've tried anal play, because they don't know what they're doing, so that turns them off from it. Lots of people will be surprised at how much they enjoy it if they just did it right."

Because most research on anal intercourse addresses men who have sex with men, little data exists on the prevalence of anal intercourse among heterosexual couples.[6][49] In Kimberly R. McBride's 2010 clinical review on heterosexual anal intercourse and other forms of anal sexual activity, it is suggested that changing norms may affect the frequency of heterosexual anal sex. McBride and her colleagues investigated the prevalence of non-intercourse anal sex behaviors among a sample of men (n=1,299) and women (n=1,919) compared to anal intercourse experience and found that 51% of men and 43% of women had participated in at least one act of oral–anal sex, manual–anal sex, or anal sex toy use.[6] The report states the majority of men (n=631) and women (n=856) who reported heterosexual anal intercourse in the past 12 months were in exclusive, monogamous relationships: 69% and 73%, respectively.[6] The review added that because "relatively little attention [is] given to anal intercourse and other anal sexual behaviors between heterosexual partners", this means that it is "quite rare" to have research "that specifically differentiates the anus as a sexual organ or addresses anal sexual function or dysfunction as legitimate topics. As a result, we do not know the extent to which anal intercourse differs qualitatively from coitus."[6]


Sometimes women are turned off by the hygienic and health aspects of anything going on in the backdoor. "Many women express concern about this as an issue, but as long as you poop and then everything is cleaned out prior with an enema beforehand, there is very little chance of catching anything in there! I prefer natural enemas with no scent as these tend to irritate the rectum which can lead to a painful experience," says Singer.
That information is very necessary, but I refuse to end this on a kind of scary note. The truth is that you can have an excellent time with anal play. Or it could be the exact opposite of your thing, which is OK, too. Either way, if you keep the above information in mind, you’re way more likely to come out of the experience having explored anal sex in a safe, healthy, potentially mind-blowing way.
^ Ken Plummer (2002). Modern Homosexualities: Fragments of Lesbian and Gay Experiences. Routledge. pp. 187–191. ISBN 1134922426. Retrieved August 24, 2013. The social construction of 'sex' as vaginal intercourse affects how other forms of sexual activity are evaluated as sexually satisfying or arousing; in some cases whether an activity is seen as a sexual act at all. For example, unless a woman has been penetrated by a man's penis she is still technically a virgin even if she has had lots of sexual experience.
If you’ve had unprotected anal sex and are worried about possible HIV infection, go and see your healthcare professional straight away. You may be able to take post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent HIV infection, but it has to be taken within 72 hours to be effective. However, PEP is not a replacement for condoms and isn’t available everywhere.  

Please explain the risk if you follow ALL safety measures (off the top of my head here are just a few of them to consider): Condom, lots of lube to help prevent condom breakage (and most women I know don’t like dry anal), go slow until things are “ready”, used a toy to stretch things a little bit first, both partners got tested, did your best not to “contaminate” the vagina, were on birth control (in case the condom broke & it was that time of the month & the sperm spread to the vagina), immediately cleaned up, both washed hands immediately and took showers immediately afterwards, cleaned the sheets properly, etc… So if you do all of that, what “very risky” issues are we talking about???
But you can't just slide into anal sex (unless you're using plenty of lube...but more on that later). If you don't know what you're doing and you aren't careful, you could hurt yourself or your partner because the anus is sensitive. "Contrary to what many believe, anal sex does not have to be painful (unless people engaging in it want it to be)," says Dulcinea Pitagora, a sex therapist known as the Kink Doctor. So before you give anal a try, read our tips about how to prep, both physically and mentally.
"The key to good anal—yes, that's a thing—is having a partner you trust completely and who will do it right. That means lots of lube, start small with a pinky finger just like in Fifty Shades, then work your way up to small toys or butt plugs. After that, anal can be amazing! It is super intense, and your lover has to be extremely delicate and careful and be a good listener and super patient—and you as the receiver have to have a lot of trust in that.
5. You're gonna wanna be vocal during this process. Even if you're normally very quiet during sex, this is a time you'll wanna speak up—especially your first time trying it out with a new partner. Tell them if they're going too fast (or too slow—see point 10 below), if you feel like you're literally about to poop everywhere, or if you're experiencing pain/discomfort. Also, tell them if it feels good! If you're feeling nervous, chances are your partner is, too. Positive feedback—we love it!
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