Using a new condom is especially important if you’re switching from anal to vaginal penetration so you can avoid moving bacteria from your anus to your vagina or urethra. Your anus is home to all kinds of bacteria your vagina and related parts aren’t used to—namely, gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, like E. coli. When this bacteria reaches your vagina, it can cause vaginal infections, like bacterial vaginosis, which can lead to vaginal itching, burning during urination, a “fishy” vaginal odor, and gray, white, or green vaginal discharge, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can also spread to your urethra, where it can cause a urinary tract infection. According to the Mayo Clinic, this can cause symptoms like constantly needing to pee, then a burning sensation when you do, along with cloudy urine and pelvic pain.

However, that's beginning to change. Anal sex has gone mainstream with TV shows like The Mindy Project and Girls featuring anal play in primetime. "Many women who are considering anal sex for the first time have lots of questions. Most commonly, women have concerns that it will be painful, uncomfortable, and/or awkward. Nervous first-timers should start with plenty of foreplay, take things very slowly, and use lots of lube. Above all else, couples should be sure to communicate openly about what feels good and what doesn't," says Tristan Weedmark, We-Vibe's global passion ambassador.
^ The social construction of male 'homosexuality' in India, by S Asthana and R. Oostvogels, published in 'Social Science & Medicine', vol 52(2001), Quote: "Indian culture is highly homosocial and displays of affection, body contact and the sharing of beds between men is socially acceptable (Kahn, 1994) This creates opportunities for sexual contact, though sexual behavior in this context is rarely seen as real sex, but as play. Much of this same-sex sexual activity begins in adolescence between school friends and within family environments and is non-penetrative... Young men who cultivate such relationships do not consider themselves to be 'homosexual' but conceive their behavior in terms of sexual desire, opportunity and pleasure."
19. If you try it a few times and hate it, don't keep trying it because you think it'll eventually be tolerable. "Assuming you have a considerate lover who's invested in you feeling good, I think you'd know within the first five times whether you like it or not," Kerner says, explaining that this depends on a variety of factors. "I've encountered women who hated receiving oral sex initially but love it now, and it was because they were self-conscious. It depends on your levels of inhibition, your feelings about your partner, your feelings about your body. If all these things are good to go, and you just don't like the sensation, you'll know pretty fast."
14. Like peeing immediately after sex to avoid a UTI, it's good to go to the bathroom right after you're done. You'll also probably feel like you have to anyway. You have also opened yourself up to the joy of butt queefs. They're not farts, no matter what anyone says. Unlike frontal queefs, they might go on for a few hours as the air escapes. On the bright side, you are a human beatbox, and your partner can lay a sick freestyle over the top if s/he feels so inclined.
I admit, I’m sure I missed something in my quick list there. Sure it is POSSIBLE that you could go to the local pool and swim in the water with a woman who just had unprotected anal sex and YOU (if you’re female) end up pregnant from it or there is a chance of either sex catching a disease… but let’s get real, what are the odds in that actually happening??? Sex is risky, it has been since before Christ was born. Refresh my memory, what is the “oldest profession”??? Ever since there were more than just Adam and Eve around, there has been a risk of catching a STD. (The new term STI was probable between just the two of them. Even with conventional sex, being safe, etc… it isn’t uncommon to get a UTI, yeast Infection, etc.. after having sex for several hours with a partner who you have been in a mutually monogamous relationship with for years.) {Note, that was not a religious comment… it was more sarcasm for those who don’t understand what BC actually means.}

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“Awkwardness doesn’t mean you’re not close with your partner or in a healthy relationship, it’s because we’re taught from a young age that sex is a taboo topic,” Levkoff says. “Bringing up to a partner a potential thing that you want to try is going to be uncomfortable regardless of what it is. I think that we forget that a part of sexual intimacy means being vulnerable and being able to have those conversations. That’s a human thing. It’s part of being sexually mature.”
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Ok, just hear me out… because I don’t want anyone thinking this is 100% birth control. No, your rectum does not connect you anything to cause pregnancy. Think about it like masturbating onto your partner’s vulva (the lips and stuff on the outside), this is because there is a SMALL chance that the little swimmers could swim all the way home. This is not very common, but it is possible.
Maybe you're super excited to try anal and you want to get right in there — don't. It's always best to start slowly with a new sexual experience, but is especially important when you're trying anal sex because the sphincter muscles in an anus are tightly closed. So, instead of jumping in with a penis or sex toy, have your partner stick one (lubed up!) finger inside your rectum first. Then, slowly add more fingers until you're ready to move on to penetration with a penis or with a strap-on.
I’ve had a lot of anal sex before with women who were already experienced and I tried it with my current girlfriend for the first time. She was a bit drunk and on her period and was having a hard time giving me a blow job so she told me to do her wherever I wanted. I asked where she wanted and suggested tits or ass, she said she was down for ass if I wanted it. I told her what I wanted (ass) because it feels so good so she asked where the lube was and I got it.
You may not want to know about this one. It happens when you swallow or breathe in the eggs of tiny worms. They get in your digestive system through contaminated food and things like bed linens, bathroom fixtures, toys, and sandboxes. It’s more common in children. The itching usually happens at night, when a female worm lays eggs around the anus. You may see them in your underwear or in the toilet after a bowel movement. They look like tiny pieces of white thread. If you or your child has pinworms, your whole family may be treated for them.
For some women out there, anal sex is the cherry on top of a sexual sundae: a little extra treat that elevates something that was already delicious on its own (duh, talking about sex here). But for others, it's more like pâté: intriguing enough, worth a try, but absolutely not up their alleys (as in, a penis will probably not be going up that alley ever again).
37. “For me, it’s because it’s really tight. It’s a really tight hole that can be fully exposed, so you can really get in really deep, and you feel really connected to the woman on a primal level being so deep in her like that. I think it a way it’s the ultimate mark on a woman too. In somewhat of a dominating way. Something about the fact of her never forgetting you deep inside her primal area and letting yourself go inside her is extremely erotic. It’s kind of like imprinting on her. It’s also a woman giving her body fully to you. If you’re doing anal, then you probably have already done everything else. This woman is allowing you access to her all her holes and that’s really hot for a man. I’ve heard in a scientific sense, that the more ways a woman receives a man’s cum, the more likely she is to get pregnant by him. For example, women who swallowed a man’s cum were more likely to get pregnant by him later. They hypothesize it’s due to her body adapting and recognizing his cum when they receive it in different ways. So I think there is a primal, biological reward system for a man to want to be with a woman in all ways and mix with her completely.”
Chlamydia and erectile dysfunction: What's the link? Some people who have chlamydia also experience erectile dysfunction (ED), which involves problems getting or maintaining an erection. Chlamydia can infect the prostate gland, leading to prostatitis, pain, and ED. In this article, learn more about the link between this common infection and ED, and treatments for both. Read now
2. Try out anal play first. Before embarking on the full monte of penetrative, anal sex, you can—and should!—give lighter anal play a try. This is open to interpretation, and could mean anything from toys to fingers or mouths. It'll give you a lower-pressure idea of what the ~sensations~ of anal stimulation feel like, and is a way of working up to the big show. Or not! If you decide some light anal play is all you're interested in, camp out there forever. No rules here, except to use lube, have consent, and USE LUBE.
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