If done right, absolutely. While it’s true that anal is one of the riskiest types of sex, in terms of spreading sexually transmitted disease – including HIV – if you follow safe sex practices and do it with someone you trust and respect (even better, someone you love), it’s perfectly safe. Go slow, be gentle, listen to each other, use lots of lube, and wear a condom and you’ll be fine.
Because most research on anal intercourse addresses men who have sex with men, little data exists on the prevalence of anal intercourse among heterosexual couples.[6][49] In Kimberly R. McBride's 2010 clinical review on heterosexual anal intercourse and other forms of anal sexual activity, it is suggested that changing norms may affect the frequency of heterosexual anal sex. McBride and her colleagues investigated the prevalence of non-intercourse anal sex behaviors among a sample of men (n=1,299) and women (n=1,919) compared to anal intercourse experience and found that 51% of men and 43% of women had participated in at least one act of oral–anal sex, manual–anal sex, or anal sex toy use.[6] The report states the majority of men (n=631) and women (n=856) who reported heterosexual anal intercourse in the past 12 months were in exclusive, monogamous relationships: 69% and 73%, respectively.[6] The review added that because "relatively little attention [is] given to anal intercourse and other anal sexual behaviors between heterosexual partners", this means that it is "quite rare" to have research "that specifically differentiates the anus as a sexual organ or addresses anal sexual function or dysfunction as legitimate topics. As a result, we do not know the extent to which anal intercourse differs qualitatively from coitus."[6]
Anal intercourse is sometimes used as a substitute for vaginal intercourse during menstruation.[5] The likelihood of pregnancy occurring during anal sex is greatly reduced, as anal sex alone cannot lead to pregnancy unless sperm is somehow transported to the vaginal opening. Because of this, some couples practice anal intercourse as a form of contraception, often in the absence of a condom.[5][38][44]
Kimmie KaBoom: I also am against people using poppers or pills to relax muscles for the same reasons. [And] remember to practice safe sex, because STDs can still be transmitted anally, too. [Note: The fragility of anal wall tissue makes micro tears more likely, increasing the risk of sexually transmitted disease transmission significantly versus vaginal sex.]
^ Jump up to: a b See here and pages 48–49 for the majority of researchers and heterosexuals defining virginity loss/"technical virginity" by whether or not a person has engaged in vaginal sex. Laura M. Carpenter (2005). Virginity lost: an intimate portrait of first sexual experiences. NYU Press. pp. 295 pages. ISBN 978-0-8147-1652-6. Retrieved October 9, 2011.

Asking for anal can be a bit daunting, no matter who you are. Have a one-on-one with your partner and let them know that this is something you want to try. Be honest about your feelings about it. In a healthy relationship, you should be able to discuss anything openly. Everyone wants to have a good experience. If they are into it, go ahead and get started.
Joanna Angel: I go to a proctologist a couple of times a year just to check everything out… It’s kind of important if you’re going to be engaging in anal all the time. My gynecologist recommended I go to one. You’ve got to just listen to your body. You’ve just got to know when you’re too sore and when it’s not the right day for anal. That’s important for any kind of sex, especially for women.
13. You can lie flat on your stomach, get in doggy-style, or do missionary—and that is the order of what will hurt the least to the most. At least, in my (minimal) experience. You can tear your anus if you use a certain position that allows for more penetration before you're ready, and Taormino points out that the missionary position allows for the least clitoral stimulation and suggests receiver-on-top for beginners. "Insertive partners who are inexperienced, nervous about how to penetrate their partners anally, or fearful of hurting their partners may find this position most relaxing because the receiver can do much of the decision-making and work."
There are little published data on how many heterosexual men would like their anus to be sexually stimulated in a heterosexual relationship. Anecdotally, it is a substantial number. What data we do have almost all relate to penetrative sexual acts, and the superficial contact of the anal ring with fingers or the tongue is even less well documented but may be assumed to be a common sexual activity for men of all sexual orientations.[67]
Using protection during anal sex is important to reduce your risk of catching an STI. For penetrative sex, make sure you use a condom and lots of lube – some people feel safer using extra-thick condoms for anal sex. Dental dams also offer good protection for rimming. Taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is another way to prevent HIV infection, but it may not be available everywhere.
9. Between thin water-based lubes (like Astroglide) and thicker ones (KY), go with the thicker ones, because they don't dry out as quickly. In sex educator Tristan Taormino's crazy-helpful Ultimate Guide to Anal Sex for Women, she mentions that Crisco has been a favorite of the LGBT community for a long time, but it's bad to use with condoms because it can eventually poke tiny holes in the latex.
Although people tend to think that having an orgasm is the goal of sex, you can get lots of pleasure from doing sexual things even if you don’t have an orgasm. In fact, putting a lot of pressure on having an orgasm can make you or your partner anxious, which can make sex stressful and less enjoyable. Relax, and remember that pleasure, not orgasms, is the goal.
In addition to HIV, a person can get other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) like chlamydia and gonorrhea from anal sex without condoms. Even if a condom is used, some STDs can still be transmitted through skin-to-skin contact (like syphilis or herpes). One can also get hepatitis A, B, and C; parasites like Giardia and intestinal amoebas; and bacteria like Shigella, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and E. coli from anal sex without a condom because they’re transmitted through feces. Getting tested and treated for STDs reduces a person’s chances of getting or transmitting HIV through anal sex. If one has never had hepatitis A or B, there are vaccines to prevent them. A health care provider can make recommendations about vaccines.
However, that's beginning to change. Anal sex has gone mainstream with TV shows like The Mindy Project and Girls featuring anal play in primetime. "Many women who are considering anal sex for the first time have lots of questions. Most commonly, women have concerns that it will be painful, uncomfortable, and/or awkward. Nervous first-timers should start with plenty of foreplay, take things very slowly, and use lots of lube. Above all else, couples should be sure to communicate openly about what feels good and what doesn't," says Tristan Weedmark, We-Vibe's global passion ambassador.
I admit, I’m sure I missed something in my quick list there. Sure it is POSSIBLE that you could go to the local pool and swim in the water with a woman who just had unprotected anal sex and YOU (if you’re female) end up pregnant from it or there is a chance of either sex catching a disease… but let’s get real, what are the odds in that actually happening??? Sex is risky, it has been since before Christ was born. Refresh my memory, what is the “oldest profession”??? Ever since there were more than just Adam and Eve around, there has been a risk of catching a STD. (The new term STI was probable between just the two of them. Even with conventional sex, being safe, etc… it isn’t uncommon to get a UTI, yeast Infection, etc.. after having sex for several hours with a partner who you have been in a mutually monogamous relationship with for years.) {Note, that was not a religious comment… it was more sarcasm for those who don’t understand what BC actually means.}
2a : of, relating to, or characterized by the stage of psychosexual development in psychoanalytic theory that follows the oral stage and during which a child derives libidinal gratification from the expulsion and retention of the feces and conflict arises from parental demands regarding toilet training During the anal stage, from about 18 months to 3 years, the sphincter muscles become sensitive and controllable and bowel and bladder retention and elimination become a source of gratification.— David G. Myers, Psychology, 2001
A clinical trial is a study to answer a scientific question, such as whether one treatment is better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned in the laboratory. Each trial answers certain scientific questions in order to find new and better ways to help cancer patients. During treatment clinical trials, information is collected about the effects of a new treatment and how well it works. If a clinical trial shows that a new treatment is better than one currently being used, the new treatment may become "standard." Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.
So I withdraw and push in a well lubed but pretty big thick black vibrating polyurethane offset rotating dildo, which once it’s five inches in I switch on and it’s buzzing gently and (invisibly) twirling around offset inside her anus – and STILL it’s her first time and now she’s bloody mad for it. I get the vibrations and the whirling to maximum – she’s almost babbling with pleasure. All on her first anal date!!

Inadequately cleaned toys can serve as a reservoir for bacterial growth and even some viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a condom with toys – even if you don’t share your toys – will reduce the risk of infections. Hepatitis C, furthermore, can survive as a miniscule drop of dried blood on a toy (or other object) for up to 3 months and become reactivated when wet. (If your eyes aren’t bulging, go back and re-read that last sentence.) (Side note: that’s why sharing cocaine straws is a very real method of Hep C transmission: cocaine causes micro-tears in the nose, leaving invisible specs of blood on the straw that harbor the virus for up to 3 months.) So instead of scrubbing your toys with a nail brush or boiling them compulsively, just use a condom and rinse them off in warm, soapy water afterwards.
1. Relax those booty muscles. There are a bunch of li'l muscles around your anus that can be pretty tight if you're not relaxed. And as logic follows, if those muscles and your anal sphincter are tight, inserting anything can be painful and difficult rather than pleasurable and easy. Try something like deep breathing or a relaxing massage with your partner to make sure both you and your bum muscles are sufficiently chilled out, pre-anal play.

According to a 2010 study from the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB) that was authored by Debby Herbenick et al., although anal intercourse is reported by fewer women than other partnered sex behaviors, partnered women in the age groups between 18–49 are significantly more likely to report having anal sex in the past 90 days. Women engaged in anal intercourse less commonly than men. Vaginal intercourse was practiced more than insertive anal intercourse among men, but 13% to 15% of men aged 25 to 49 practiced insertive anal intercourse.[50][51]


Take things slowly, use plenty of lubrication, and stop if it becomes too painful. Don’t aim to have full penis penetration your first go-round. Try using a finger, and then upgrade to two or three fingers. A toy might be a good option, too, as you grow more comfortable with the sensation. After the first time or two, you and your partner will likely find that the pleasure trumps any initial discomforts.
×