Repetitive penetrative anal sex may result in the anal sphincters becoming weakened, which may cause rectal prolapse or affect the ability to hold in feces (a condition known as fecal incontinence).[3][92] Rectal prolapse is relatively uncommon, however, especially in men, and its causes are not well understood.[94][95] Kegel exercises have been used to strengthen the anal sphincters and overall pelvic floor, and may help prevent or remedy fecal incontinence.[3][96]
^ Nussbaum, Martha C. (1994). "Platonic Love and Colorado Law: The Relevance of Ancient Greek Norms to Modern Sexual Controversies". Virginia Law Review. 80 (7): 1562–3. JSTOR 1073514. (Registration required (help)). the kinaidos is clearly a person who chronically plays the passive role [...] More recently, I have been convince by arguments of the late John J. Winkler that kinaidos usually connotes willingness to accept money for sex, as well as habitual passivity [...] In any case, there is no doubt that we are not dealing with an isolated act, but rather a type of person who habitually chooses activity that Callicles finds shameful. That, and no view about same-sex relations per se, is the basis of his criticism. In fact, Callicles is depicted as having a young boyfriend of his own. *The boyfriend is named Demos, also the name for the Athenian "people," to whom Callicles is also devoted. It is likely that the pun on the name is sexual: as Callicles seduces Demos, so also the demos. (It would be assumed that he would practice intercrural intercourse with this boyfriend, thus avoiding putting him in anything like the kinaidos shamed position
16. That being said, you can totally clean things up. The key to anal play is comfort, so do whatever you need to help with any lingering anxiety. "Using an anal douche is not harmful if only done once in awhile and might help you relax your concerns about your bowels," advises Pierce. You can use something as simple as warm water for a quick cleanse too.
Receptive anal sex is much riskier for getting HIV. The bottom partner is 13 times more likely to get infected than the top. However, it’s possible for either partner to get HIV through anal sex from certain body fluids—blood, semen (cum), pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum), or rectal fluids—of a person who has HIV. Using condoms or medicines to protect against transmission can decrease this risk.

However, that's beginning to change. Anal sex has gone mainstream with TV shows like The Mindy Project and Girls featuring anal play in primetime. "Many women who are considering anal sex for the first time have lots of questions. Most commonly, women have concerns that it will be painful, uncomfortable, and/or awkward. Nervous first-timers should start with plenty of foreplay, take things very slowly, and use lots of lube. Above all else, couples should be sure to communicate openly about what feels good and what doesn't," says Tristan Weedmark, We-Vibe's global passion ambassador.
A fungus, like the one that causes most vaginal yeast infections, can also cause anal itching. And certain kinds of bacteria can, too. For example, a staph skin infection can happen almost anywhere, including the area around your anus. And the same kind of bacteria that causes strep throat can trigger a red, itchy rash around the anus. This is more common in kids than adults.
"The prostate is around three to four inches inside the rectum and about an inch in diameter," Glickman explains. "It's easier for a partner to find after a little flirting or foreplay because when the prostate is aroused it starts producing fluid that makes it fill up like a water balloon." Transgender women also have prostates, Glickman says, but if you're using hormones to transition, it may shrink and become less sensitive.
6. Throw other stimulation into the mix. Listen, they don't make those wild-looking, three-pronged sex toys for nothing. Once you're in the groove of things, add in some clit stimulation, some vaginal stimulation, or heck, all three. Some women say this combo feels overstimulating in the best way. In any case, most women need some combination of stimulation to orgasm—whether that's clit/vaginal, or anal/clit+vaginal is totally subjective. But isn't it fun to learn new things about your own orgasms?

Anal sex videos introduce porn lovers to a journey into the netherworld. Often involving the insertion of a dick into an asshole, anal intercourse can also imply fingering or the use of sex toys. Anal penetration can even involve multiple cocks at once. Anal sometimes ends with an internal cumshot, known as a creampie, which can be a sweet surprise!
Historically, anal sex has been commonly associated with male homosexuality. However, many gay men and men who have sex with men in general (those who identify as gay, bisexual, heterosexual or have not identified their sexual identity) do not engage in anal sex.[8][9][53][54] Among men who have anal sex with other men, the insertive partner may be referred to as the top and the one being penetrated may be referred to as the bottom. Those who enjoy either role may be referred to as versatile.[55][56]
Most anal cancers are cured with combination therapy. If caught early, many cancers that come back after nonsurgical treatment are treated effectively with surgery. While combination radiation/chemotherapy produces more side effects, this approach also results in the best long-term survival rates. After completing this treatment, as many as 70-90% of patients are still alive and cancer free at 5 years.
Most cases of anal cancer are related to infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV). Anal sex alone does not cause anal cancer; the risk of anal cancer through anal sex is attributed to HPV infection, which is often contracted through unprotected anal sex.[75] Anal cancer is relatively rare, and significantly less common than cancer of the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer); the American Cancer Society states that it affects approximately 7,060 people (4,430 in women and 2,630 in men) and results in approximately 880 deaths (550 in women and 330 in men) in the United States, and that, though anal cancer has been on the rise for many years, it is mainly diagnosed in adults, "with an average age being in the early 60s" and it "affects women somewhat more often than men."[75] Though anal cancer is serious, treatment for it is "often very effective" and most anal cancer patients can be cured of the disease; the American Cancer Society adds that "receptive anal intercourse also increases the risk of anal cancer in both men and women, particularly in those younger than the age of 30. Because of this, men who have sex with men have a high risk of this cancer."[75]
I have found that the 1st few times anal sex is tried. It is best not to pull in & out at all, when you’re partner says it’s okay to start moving, go in circles with the love muscle or strap on. Use the circular motion everytime , your partner will go in & out when the pain finally goes away all the way. Especially if the partner is extra small like me. I’m medically documented as being super small inside, everything small. My husband love’s it, but it puts me at higher risk of real injury. I understand the alarm that the 1 lady mentioned. I learned in high school sex ed. That both partners get micro tares upon intercourse. It’s worse when dry. So without proper/ lots of lube you can actually ripp a person open. The porn star laughs the internal stitches off. I read it all the time. Oh haha look what I can survive. So it’s really important to listen to the advice provided. Slow, slow, gentle, communication. If you get blood, like 1 comment mentioned. Then up the lube and slow the #@$!% down! ! As small as I am I’ve only had blood when disrespected. Scar tissue don’t stretch it rippes. I’ve had a hysterectomy, I know that 1st hand as well. If you’re partner has a really hard time understanding, try what I always have. Try switching the vulnerability roles. Don’t mush the person’s insides just because it’s been done to you. Be nice, and it can usually become a nice addition to your sex life. A man cannot understand until he’s man enough to allow a woman that kind of experience. And manly men? It is not gay!! You want what you want from women, truth is what’s good for the gander is good for the goose, you’ll open doors that never existed before. Keep in mind that a woman’s body changes up to 500 times per day, just because it’s going well doesn’t mean that it cannot become very painful 1/2 way through. Stay versatile and keep mutual pleasure going. It also hurts me to have a man pull out all the time. It resets the butt back to tight. Also, being too rough can and does cause prolapse. Thank God I’ve never been hurt that bad. I’ve cared for people with prolapse. I came out of the forest in 97 and was a c.n.a. for 4 yrs. My biggest problem is the total lack of meaningful medical sexual education. For instance, most female rectum is on average 6 inches long. The gut can move some hence the super slow start. But hey men some of us will never be able to take 10 plus inches balls deep up the ass. That doesn’t make us less of a woman, just means you boys have to step up be real men and give a shit.. if you do you’ll be able to give your woman the kind of rectal orgasms. That I get. If you can, boy hang on you might get a broken dick during something that strong. Well gotta go suck my husband, get some lovin.
Even if the anal they do on screen is hardly realistic for most people in everyday life, though, porn stars (like other sex workers) still have gobs of experience with back door play. (“I know my insides pretty well,” the anal queen Mandy Muse told me, “considering I’ve gone pretty far up and touched them.”) Sure, they sometimes have nasty accidents, or suffer horror stories. And, barring one or two like Kelly, who says that in her personal life she likes to “be ripped around and stretched to the core in an anal Olympics session” like she is on screen, most say they don’t do it nearly as often in their personal lives, and certainly not as hardcore or for as long as they do in scenes. But they know anal, and are happy to share tips for how to do it well.
In Japan, records (including detailed shunga) show that some males engaged in penetrative anal intercourse with males,[117] and evidence suggestive of widespread male-female anal intercourse in a pre-modern culture can be found in the erotic vases, or stirrup-spout pots, made by the Moche people of Peru; in a survey, of a collection of these pots, it was found that 31 percent of them depicted male-female anal intercourse significantly more than any other sex act.[118] Moche pottery of this type belonged to the world of the dead, which was believed to be a reversal of life. Therefore, the reverse of common practices was often portrayed. The Larco Museum houses an erotic gallery in which this pottery is showcased.[119]
Condoms – Unprotected anal sex is considered a high-risk activity for spreading sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) and disease [9], more so than vaginal sex [10], because the anus is more delicate that the vagina [11]. In fact, the CDC considers anal sex the riskiest sexual activity for transmitting HIV [12], especially as the receiver who is 13 times more likely to contract HIV [13].
Fortunately, sex educators have met this rising demand with a wealth of how-to guides and things to keep in mind for those exploring anal. Unfortunately, many people dive right in without doing much research. That means, what little anal education many first timers have often comes from porn, where anal is often portrayed as easy: just shove an unlubricated toy or peen up an asshole, with no preparation, and pump hard for, like, an hour.
Latex or polyurethane male condoms are highly effective in preventing HIV and certain other STDs when used correctly from start to finish for each act of anal sex. People who report using condoms consistently reduced their risk of getting HIV through insertive anal sex with an HIV-positive partner, on average, by 63%, and receptive anal sex with an HIV-positive partner, on average, by 72%. Condoms are much less effective when not used consistently. It is also important that sufficient water- or silicone-based lubricant be used during anal sex to prevent condom breakage and tearing of tissue. Female nitrile condoms can also prevent HIV and some other STDs. Since condoms are not 100% effective, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk.
8. Try it on your own first. You know how it's basically impossible to tickle yourself? This isn't the same, but trying out anal foreplay on your own is informed by a similar mind-set. You won't be surprised as much by your own, um, touch. It won't be the same as it would be coming from a partner, but it's a good way to feel out if you're into the sensation.
As with other sexual practices, people without sound knowledge about the sexual risks involved are susceptible to STIs. Because of the view that anal sex is not "real sex" and therefore does not result in virginity loss, or pregnancy, teenagers and other young people may consider vaginal intercourse riskier than anal intercourse and believe that a STI can only result from vaginal intercourse.[79][80][81] It may be because of these views that condom use with anal sex is often reported to be low and inconsistent across all groups in various countries.[79]
If done right, absolutely. While it’s true that anal is one of the riskiest types of sex, in terms of spreading sexually transmitted disease – including HIV – if you follow safe sex practices and do it with someone you trust and respect (even better, someone you love), it’s perfectly safe. Go slow, be gentle, listen to each other, use lots of lube, and wear a condom and you’ll be fine.

Partaking in any form of sex – be it oral, anal, or vaginal, can put one at risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Anal sex, however, carries the highest risk of transmission. This is because the tissue in the anus is quite fragile and thus incurs small, microscopic tears during the act of anal sex. These tears expose trace amounts of blood, making it much more likely for HIV and/or Hepatitis B or C to be transmitted. The risk of contracting these STIs is greater for the recipient (aka the “bottom”), but the “top” is also at risk. This is still true when lots of lubrication is used.
First, I’m going to talk about some of the fundamental tips for having great anal sex, then we’re going to cover the actual anal sex techniques and positions you should be using during the act. If you want to skip straight to the anal sex techniques and positions section, click here. I have also created a separate guide here on how to full prepare your body for anal sex (hygiene, etc.).
In case you hadn’t noticed, hetero anal sex is, like, huge right now. Just a few decades ago, outside of queer circles, it was seen as a taboo act that only about a tenth of men and a quarter of women would cop to researchers to having tried at least once. Now, anal is a fixture of mainstream pop, not to mention porn, culture. In truth, not many hetero men or women try it, much less on the reg. (CDC data shows about a third of hetero women have ever tried anal; the number who regularly engage in it is unclear, but likely much lower. Data on hetero men experimenting with anal stimulation is hard to find, although prostate massager sales have grown rapidly of late and some reporting indicates rising interest.) Still, many sexually active folk, especially hetero women, reportedly feel pressure to dip a toe into butt stuff.
19. “Anal sex feels good, don’t get me wrong, but so much about it is in your brain. If you’re gay it’s this thing of being “fucked,” feeling another dude’s warm dick inside of you, knowing his dick is inside of your ass going in and out, watching him thrust, seeing how hot he looks when he sweats, thinking to yourself, ‘Yeah, fuck me!'” – Jason, 38, New Yor
If done right, absolutely. While it’s true that anal is one of the riskiest types of sex, in terms of spreading sexually transmitted disease – including HIV – if you follow safe sex practices and do it with someone you trust and respect (even better, someone you love), it’s perfectly safe. Go slow, be gentle, listen to each other, use lots of lube, and wear a condom and you’ll be fine.
Yes, you can still contract or transmit STDs through anal and oral sex. Anal sex can more easily damage tissue (tears in the lining of the anus or rectum) than during vaginal sex because the anus is not designed for insertion. Therefore, the skin barrier that often protects against infection is broken and STDs can more easily enter the body. This means that transmitting or contracting an STD is more likely from anal sex than with vaginal or oral sex.
Local resection: A surgical procedure in which the tumor is cut from the anus along with some of the healthy tissue around it. Local resection may be used if the cancer is small and has not spread. This procedure may save the sphincter muscles so the patient can still control bowel movements. Tumors that form in the lower part of the anus can often be removed with local resection.

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. The purpose of this is to help with education and create better conversations between patients and their healthcare providers.
First, a few words about the survey. We shared this 15-question anonymous survey with our social media followers, on our website and in our newsletters—to reach a convenience sample of people connected to San Francisco AIDS Foundation. The 412 people who took the survey likely felt they had something to say about pain and sex. (In other words, the sample isn’t representative of our entire community or San Francisco.)
Unless you're fluid-bonded with your partner (meaning that you've both been tested for STIs, have been cleared, and aren't having sex with anyone else), there's risk for contracting STIs with any type of unprotected sex — including anal. "Unprotected anal intercourse is high-risk for many sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea, HIV, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes, HPV, and hepatitis," according to Planned Parenthood. So, please use condoms. Even if you're using a strap-on, it's important to use condoms if the toy has been used with multiple partners.

17. It feels best when there's some additional stimulation going on. Vaginal, clitoral, nipple-centric—whichever feels best for you. While some women only need butt play à la carte, most women can't come from anal stimulation alone. "The anal part is something that's an accent. It adds to the overall experience," says Ian Kerner, sex expert, researcher, and author of She Comes First: The Thinking Man's Guide to Pleasuring a Woman. (Incidentally, women who have had anal sex report more frequent orgasms than those who haven't.) That being said...


Maybe you're super excited to try anal and you want to get right in there — don't. It's always best to start slowly with a new sexual experience, but is especially important when you're trying anal sex because the sphincter muscles in an anus are tightly closed. So, instead of jumping in with a penis or sex toy, have your partner stick one (lubed up!) finger inside your rectum first. Then, slowly add more fingers until you're ready to move on to penetration with a penis or with a strap-on.
Anal intercourse is sometimes used as a substitute for vaginal intercourse during menstruation.[5] The likelihood of pregnancy occurring during anal sex is greatly reduced, as anal sex alone cannot lead to pregnancy unless sperm is somehow transported to the vaginal opening. Because of this, some couples practice anal intercourse as a form of contraception, often in the absence of a condom.[5][38][44]
2. Create a chill anal play area. Listen... All sex can sometimes be messy, and anal sex and foreplay is no exception. If this is gonna stress you out to the point that you're unable to relax and enjoy yourself, try prepping your space ahead of time. Like, maybe strip the fancy sheets off your bed or cover your comforter with a soft, washable blanket.
Strong views are often expressed about anal sex. It is controversial in various cultures, especially with regard to religious prohibitions. This is commonly due to prohibitions against anal sex among males or teachings about the procreative purpose of sexual activity.[5][7] It may be considered taboo or unnatural, and is a criminal offense in some countries, punishable by corporal or capital punishment.[5][7] By contrast, people also see anal sex as a natural and valid form of sexual activity that may be as fulfilling as other desired sexual expressions, and as an enhancing or primary element of their sex lives.[5][7]
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