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As with most forms of sexual activity, anal sex participants risk contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs/STDs). Anal sex is considered a high-risk sexual practice because of the vulnerability of the anus and rectum. The anal and rectal tissues are delicate and do not provide lubrication like the vagina does, so they can easily tear and permit disease transmission, especially if a personal lubricant is not used.[3][2][14] Anal sex without protection of a condom is considered the riskiest form of sexual activity,[14][15][16] and therefore health authorities such as the World Health Organization (WHO) recommend safe sex practices for anal sex.[17]
But porn anal, most in the adult industry will gladly tell you, is a fantasy. “Girls train their assholes in order to take the kind of crazy poundings they take on film,” says Skylar Snow, an adult performer who entered the industry last year. That training and prep is different for everyone, but usually it involves acclimating anuses with fingers or toys for hours or days before a scene, and using relaxation tricks. Some take supplements to keep their BMs regular, fasting, popping Imodium, and doing at least one enema in the half-day or day before a scene to minimize the risk of a fecal mishap. “The controlled environment of porn really does help,” says Joseline Kelly, who entered the industry in 2015. "Because, OK, I know I’m going to have anal with this person over here and at this time, so you just feel 100 percent ready” in a way you often can’t in real life.
Condoms – Unprotected anal sex is considered a high-risk activity for spreading sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) and disease [9], more so than vaginal sex [10], because the anus is more delicate that the vagina [11]. In fact, the CDC considers anal sex the riskiest sexual activity for transmitting HIV [12], especially as the receiver who is 13 times more likely to contract HIV [13].
Repetitive penetrative anal sex may result in the anal sphincters becoming weakened, which may cause rectal prolapse or affect the ability to hold in feces (a condition known as fecal incontinence).[3][92] Rectal prolapse is relatively uncommon, however, especially in men, and its causes are not well understood.[94][95] Kegel exercises have been used to strengthen the anal sphincters and overall pelvic floor, and may help prevent or remedy fecal incontinence.[3][96]
Asking for anal can be a bit daunting, no matter who you are. Have a one-on-one with your partner and let them know that this is something you want to try. Be honest about your feelings about it. In a healthy relationship, you should be able to discuss anything openly. Everyone wants to have a good experience. If they are into it, go ahead and get started.
I’ve always enjoyed anal sex, it usually came doggy style. I haven’t dated in many years, but a male friend recently sent me a dildo, well, superb. He wanted to watch me, so I videoed everything for him. This was the first time I ever got into different positions for anal. Including laying on my side as mentioned previously. I just love anal, and when you’re doing for yourself, positions are key, I can get doggy style in but it strains my arms, the easiest, most comfortable, with less arm straining I’ve found for myself is to lie on back, knees to chest, spread or not. I love anal either way, and men who actually know what they are doing in bed are superb. I’ve recently got completely involved with a bodacious beautiful man I grew up with. WE haven’t had sex yet, I’ve been saving myself for my perfect man, the last man I’ll ever be with. He will enjoy me completely, my sexual appetite and desires have only increased over the years. Wow, it’ll be intensely awesome. I’ve noticed though, reading your bad girl bible, I was doing everything right from the beginning and I’ve learned so much as well. (Its been about 7 yrs now since I let a man touch me) And I’m ecstatic that I’m giving myself to my “Perfect Man”., and what I have in-store for him. WOW!!!
You may not want to know about this one. It happens when you swallow or breathe in the eggs of tiny worms. They get in your digestive system through contaminated food and things like bed linens, bathroom fixtures, toys, and sandboxes. It’s more common in children. The itching usually happens at night, when a female worm lays eggs around the anus. You may see them in your underwear or in the toilet after a bowel movement. They look like tiny pieces of white thread. If you or your child has pinworms, your whole family may be treated for them.
“The truth is that our minds have this incredible way of making things less enjoyable for us, if it’s something that we’re not totally into,” Levkoff says. “If we’re nervous or uncomfortable our body shows it — our muscles tighten, we start to clench, we feel anxious, we’re not relaxed and ready anymore, and that means we’re less likely to feel pleasure.”
Reports regarding the prevalence of anal sex among gay men and other men who have sex with men vary. A survey in The Advocate in 1994 indicated that 46% of gay men preferred to penetrate their partners, while 43% preferred to be the receptive partner.[55] Other sources suggest that roughly three-fourths of gay men have had anal sex at one time or another, with an equal percentage participating as tops and bottoms.[55] A 2012 NSSHB sex survey in the U.S. suggests high lifetime participation in anal sex among gay men: 83.3% report ever taking part in anal sex in the insertive position and 90% in the receptive position, even if only between a third and a quarter self-report very recent engagement in the practice, defined as 30 days or less.[63]
Your man also needs to be someone who will actually follow your instructions too. If he thinks he is going to be in control and calling the shots, then you are going to have to bring him down to earth and let him know that this won’t be the case. Doing this isn’t so that you can “dominate” your man, it’s so that you get to experience the pleasures of anal sex AND NOT THE PAIN.
The only way to overcome this is to have anal sex regularly. This way your sphincter will get used to being full and relaxing around your man. If you don’t get a chance for regular anal sex, then my advice is to try using a dildo with a flared base (so that it doesn’t get sucked inside you) or use a butt plug when masturbating to train yourself anally.
First, I’m going to talk about some of the fundamental tips for having great anal sex, then we’re going to cover the actual anal sex techniques and positions you should be using during the act. If you want to skip straight to the anal sex techniques and positions section, click here. I have also created a separate guide here on how to full prepare your body for anal sex (hygiene, etc.).
Anal sex can feel stimulating and pleasurable for both the person giving and receiving - but it can also take a while to get used to the sensation of it. If it doesn’t go perfectly the first time you can always try again when you’re both in the mood. Remember that you can pause or stop at any point you want. Just because you have started something doesn’t mean you need to continue – stopping is actually very normal.
Male-male anal sex was not a universally accepted practice in Ancient Greece; it was the target of jokes in some Athenian comedies.[106] Aristophanes, for instance, mockingly alludes to the practice, claiming, "Most citizens are europroktoi (wide-arsed) now."[107] The terms kinaidos, europroktoi, and katapygon were used by Greek residents to categorize men who chronically[108] practiced passive anal intercourse.[109] While pedagogic pederasty was an essential element in the education of male youths, these relationships, at least in Athens and Sparta, were expected to steer clear of penetrative sex of any kind. Greek artwork of sexual interaction between men and boys usually depicted fondling or intercrural sex, which was not condemned for violating or feminizing boys,[110] while male-male anal intercourse was usually depicted between males of the same age-group.[111] Intercrural sex was not considered penetrative and two males engaging in it was considered a "clean" act.[106] Some sources explicitly state that anal sex between men and boys was criticized as shameful and seen as a form of hubris.[110][112] Evidence suggests, however, that the younger partner in pederastic relationships (i.e., the eromenos) did engage in receptive anal intercourse so long as no one accused him of being 'feminine'.[113]
People who are HIV-negative and at very high risk for HIV can take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), if taken consistently, can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Since PrEP is not 100% effective at preventing HIV, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk. Only condoms can help protect against other STDs.
3. You might think you're pooping, but you are not. The butt is full of nerves (hence, the point of anal play and foreplay), but that doesn't necessarily mean it can tell whether something is going in or out. You can put an end to things at any time, but just know that the feeling you have is probably just from the ~new stimulation~, not a sudden urge to go.
6. Pay attention the butt cheeks too! Just because your ultimate goal is the butthole, doesn’t mean you should totally ghost your partner’s butt cheeks. Sadie Allison, founder of TickleKitty.com and author of Tickle My Tush–Mild-to-Wild Analplay Adventures for Every Booty, recommends starting off with a sensual booty massage. Using lube, “place your thumbs in the creases where the legs meet the butt cheeks and glide your thumbs along the crease from the inner thigh area to the outer side. Lift and repeat. Then, put your palms together in "prayer position," placing them on their tailbone and gliding up and down their buttcrack."

Please explain the risk if you follow ALL safety measures (off the top of my head here are just a few of them to consider): Condom, lots of lube to help prevent condom breakage (and most women I know don’t like dry anal), go slow until things are “ready”, used a toy to stretch things a little bit first, both partners got tested, did your best not to “contaminate” the vagina, were on birth control (in case the condom broke & it was that time of the month & the sperm spread to the vagina), immediately cleaned up, both washed hands immediately and took showers immediately afterwards, cleaned the sheets properly, etc… So if you do all of that, what “very risky” issues are we talking about???
While there’s definitely gastrointestinal bacteria in and around your partner’s anus, it’s probably not likely to cause a gastrointestinal illness like food poisoning when you ingest it. The exception is if they actually have a GI issue themselves, Dr. Frankhouse says. It’s a pretty simple rule: If the anilingus receiver has had any unusual bowel movements lately, it’s probably best to take this activity off the menu for now. That includes stool that’s runnier than usual, bowel movements that are more or less frequent than usual, and even irregular anal itching. All of these could be signs that there’s extra bacteria hanging out down there, which is definitely not ideal for anilingus.
For some women out there, anal sex is the cherry on top of a sexual sundae: a little extra treat that elevates something that was already delicious on its own (duh, talking about sex here). But for others, it's more like pâté: intriguing enough, worth a try, but absolutely not up their alleys (as in, a penis will probably not be going up that alley ever again).

In the majority of cases, a colostomy is not required, as many cancers can be cured with chemotherapy and radiation alone. A colostomy may be needed if the tumor does not respond well to therapy or recurs after treatment. For advanced anal cancers or unusual types, the surgeon may need to remove the rectum and anus and create a permanent colostomy. Sometimes this is the only way to remove all the cancer cells.

These days though, butt play is hot. Whether it’s Marnie getting rimmed on the hit HBO show Girls, or Harvard University offering an ‘Anal Sex 101’ workshop during their annual ‘Sex Week’, anal sex has decidedly outgrown its verboten past. A 2010 study published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine found that some 40 per cent of women ages 20-24 have engaged in anal sex at least once. And more than half have probably played around with oral or digital stimulation, whether on the giving or the receiving end.
People who are HIV-negative and at very high risk for HIV can take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), if taken consistently, can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Since PrEP is not 100% effective at preventing HIV, consider using other prevention methods to further reduce your risk. Only condoms can help protect against other STDs.
Unprotected receptive anal sex (with an HIV positive partner) is the sex act most likely to result in HIV transmission.[14][15][16] Other infections that can be transmitted by unprotected anal sex are human papillomavirus (HPV) (which can increase risk of anal cancer[75]); typhoid fever;[76] amoebiasis; chlamydia;[15] cryptosporidiosis; E. coli infections; giardiasis; gonorrhea;[15] hepatitis A; hepatitis B; hepatitis C; herpes simplex;[15] Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8);[77] lymphogranuloma venereum; Mycoplasma hominis; Mycoplasma genitalium; pubic lice;[15] salmonellosis; shigella; syphilis;[15] tuberculosis; and Ureaplasma urealyticum.[78]

"I used to be obsessed with anal. At one point in high school, I was having more anal than regular sex. When done right—and by right I mean when the guy doesn't shove his d*ck into you like a horse in heat—anal can teeter on that dangerous line between pleasure and pain. He feels bigger than ever and completely fills you up. As he's going in, you have to hold your breath because you feel like your body doesn't have room for air and his d*ck at the same time, but once he's in, the pleasure radiates through your whole body." —Nina T.
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In addition to nerve endings, pleasure from anal intercourse may be aided by the close proximity between the anus and the prostate for males, and vagina, clitoral legs and anal area for females. This is because of indirect stimulation of the prostate and vagina or clitoral legs.[7][8][9] For a male insertive partner, the tightness of the anus can be a source of pleasure via the tactile pressure on the penis.[10][11] Pleasure from the anus can also be achieved through anal masturbation, fingering,[3] facesitting, anilingus, and other penetrative and non-penetrative acts. Anal stretching or fisting is pleasurable for some, but it poses a more serious threat of damage due to the deliberate stretching of the anal and rectal tissues; its injuries include anal sphincter lacerations and rectal and sigmoid colon (rectosigmoid) perforation, which might result in death.[12] Lubricant and condoms are widely regarded as a necessity while performing anal sex as well as a slow and cautious penetration.[13]
If you’ve had unprotected anal sex and are worried about possible HIV infection, go and see your healthcare professional straight away. You may be able to take post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent HIV infection, but it has to be taken within 72 hours to be effective. However, PEP is not a replacement for condoms and isn’t available everywhere.  
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