Inadequately cleaned toys can serve as a reservoir for bacterial growth and even some viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a condom with toys – even if you don’t share your toys – will reduce the risk of infections. Hepatitis C, furthermore, can survive as a miniscule drop of dried blood on a toy (or other object) for up to 3 months and become reactivated when wet. (If your eyes aren’t bulging, go back and re-read that last sentence.) (Side note: that’s why sharing cocaine straws is a very real method of Hep C transmission: cocaine causes micro-tears in the nose, leaving invisible specs of blood on the straw that harbor the virus for up to 3 months.) So instead of scrubbing your toys with a nail brush or boiling them compulsively, just use a condom and rinse them off in warm, soapy water afterwards.

If you're playing with silicone-based toys and need a water-based lube, Sliquid Sassy is a great option that's specifically intended for anal play. It's got a thicker texture than many water-based lubes as a result — almost gel-like — to offer you all the lubrication you need. As with all water-based lubes, it'll dry out faster than silicone, but a little bit of water splashed on the right area will "re-activate" it if you need a boost when it comes to the slippery factor.
The human anus (from Latin anus meaning "ring", "circle")[1][2] is the external opening of the rectum. Two sphincters control the exit of feces from the body during an act of defecation, which is the primary function of the anus. These are the internal anal sphincter and the external anal sphincter, which are circular muscles that normally maintain constriction of the orifice and which relaxes as required by normal physiological functioning. The inner sphincter is involuntary and the outer is voluntary. It is located behind the perineum which is located behind the vagina in females and behind the scrotum in males.

He recommends starting off with a toy that’s made from an easy-to-clean material like silicone (which is nonporous and hypoallergenic), on the skinny side, and smooth with no rough edges or bumps. It should also have a flared base so that the toy doesn’t slip all the way in and get lost in your butt (which people actually go to the emergency room for all the time.)
For people with HIV, HIV medicine (called antiretroviral therapy or ART) can reduce the amount of virus in the blood and body fluids to very low levels, if taken as prescribed. This is called viral suppression—usually defined as having less than 200 copies of HIV per milliliter of blood. HIV medicine can even make the viral load so low that a test can’t detect it. This is called an undetectable viral load. People who take HIV medicine as prescribed and get and stay virally suppressed or undetectable can stay healthy for many years, and they have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to an HIV-negative partner through sex. Only condoms can help protect against some other STDs.
19. “Anal sex feels good, don’t get me wrong, but so much about it is in your brain. If you’re gay it’s this thing of being “fucked,” feeling another dude’s warm dick inside of you, knowing his dick is inside of your ass going in and out, watching him thrust, seeing how hot he looks when he sweats, thinking to yourself, ‘Yeah, fuck me!'” – Jason, 38, New Yor

For comfort in entering anally, it works to be really turned on before anal entry. Deep kissing, squeezing nipples, rubbing the vulva and having vaginal sex for a few minutes first really helps to relax the anal muscles. Using lots of lubricant, the penis can push slowly, and if there is any tightness at all, withdraw and wait until the woman feels ready to do it again. The second time again entering slowly will be more relaxed and ready. If the woman rubs her vulva hard as entry happens it will more likely be pleasurable . If not, withdraw and try again when ready. Certainly it helps to have a caring partner who you can trust to be gentle. Once you are warmed up you can go pretty hard and it’s likely to give you a really great orgasm, more than you get vaginally.


I admit, I’m sure I missed something in my quick list there. Sure it is POSSIBLE that you could go to the local pool and swim in the water with a woman who just had unprotected anal sex and YOU (if you’re female) end up pregnant from it or there is a chance of either sex catching a disease… but let’s get real, what are the odds in that actually happening??? Sex is risky, it has been since before Christ was born. Refresh my memory, what is the “oldest profession”??? Ever since there were more than just Adam and Eve around, there has been a risk of catching a STD. (The new term STI was probable between just the two of them. Even with conventional sex, being safe, etc… it isn’t uncommon to get a UTI, yeast Infection, etc.. after having sex for several hours with a partner who you have been in a mutually monogamous relationship with for years.) {Note, that was not a religious comment… it was more sarcasm for those who don’t understand what BC actually means.}
1. Don't try it if you don't want to. There's a big difference between "I don't necessarily fantasize about getting a penis enema but I want to blow my partner's mind" and "I would rather die than do this but I guess I can suffer through it because he's been pressuring me." If you're in a mutually caring, healthy relationship (with a guy who goes down on you for half an hour, minimum), maybe you'll want to do it for your partner or you won't. Either way is 100 percent fine, and if he keeps pressuring you when you have made it clear that it is not on the table, tell him to suck it.
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